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Brian Caccioppoli

Brian Caccioppoli has written 30 posts for oceanbites
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New Model Evaluates How Coastlines in the Northeast United States Respond to Sea Level Rise

Some coastlines are more resilient to sea level rise, whereas others just plain drown. A new study by geologists at the United States Geological Survey evaluate how coastlines along the northeast United States will respond to sea level rise.

Source: Wikicommons

Human Activity Far More Responsible For Rising Seas Since The Mid 20th Century

New research reports a change in the primary driver of global sea level rise. Natural climate influences on sea level rise are no longer at fault, and haven’t been since the middle of the 20th century.

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The Atlantic Ocean is the Culprit in the Case of the Cooling Eastern Pacific

A classic climate “Whodunit”? Can researchers get to the bottom of the mystery of the cooling eastern Pacific Ocean, three decades in the making?

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A Slick Study! Natural Oil Seeps and Chlorophyll

Oil seeps are naturally occurring sources of oil to the marine environment. This study looks at the impacts of oil seeps on chlorophyll concentrations near the surface of the ocean and the results are pretty slick!

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Global Consequences of Melting the Pine Island Glacier

Melting Antarctic glaciers have major consequences on global climate. In this study, climate simulations reveal a seesaw like behavior where cooling near the south pole means warming near the north pole.

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Sea Ice Plays a Key Role in Ocean Circulation

Lower amounts of sea ice in the North Atlantic disrupts the way heat is transferred, a key factor that changes large-scale ocean circulation with major global climate consequences.

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Retreat! Barrier Beaches Meet Their Demise Despite Modest Sea Level Rise

Future sea level rise poses many challenges for communities on barrier islands. However, sea level rise alone may not be the only factor that determines the fate of barrier islands in a future of rising seas.

Figure 2. The influence of individual oceans on the frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones.  The North Atlantic contributes most strongly to the global trade-off of frequency for intensity of tropical cyclones.

Global Warming Means Mixed News for Hurricanes

Less frequent hurricanes can be expected due to climate change, a surprising finding considering the long list of challenges. Sound too good to be true? Unfortunately, the trade-off can be filed under that list of challenges.

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Satellites Agree: Sea Level Rise Accelerated Over Last Decade

Satellite altimetry: talk about a game-changer! Measurement of the oceans’ sea surface height by satellite altimetry has revolutionized the study of sea level rise. But even the most precise measurements are prone to error, which can drastically impair our understanding of sea level rise.

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Slightly Refreshing News In A Time of Drought

Two hot items in climate science today are the North American drought and the decade-long warming hiatus. This study finds a relationship between these two headliners and seeks to answer the question: Are humans responsible for the drought?

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Rise Up! Overestimated sea-level rise during the 20th century.

Calculating a global average change in sea-level over the twentieth-century is no walk in the park. This study uses a new technique to critically look at previous estimates of sea-level rise. The findings suggest that previous estimates may have been too high, but what does this mean for future sea-level rise projections?

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A Leap in Sea-level Along the East Coast of North America

From 2009-2010, the Northeast coast of North America experienced approximately four inches of sea-level rise, quite the departure from the 2.5 mm per year annual average rate of rise. Researchers link this leap in sea-level to changes in Atlantic Ocean circulation and atmospheric pressure gradients. Will extreme sea-level rise events continue to be the exception, rather than the rule?

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The Not So Stable Holocene

Here at Oceanbites, we hope you have been enjoying your stay in the Holocene Epoch, a span of time ranging from present day to 11.7 thousand years ago. The Holocene has been praised for its warm and stable climate compared to the past glacial period. But more and more evidence suggests that the early Holocene was a bit more variable, with notable changes in the North Atlantic Ocean’s surface and deep water circulation.

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Barrier Island Stability Rooted in Their Plant Life

How stable are the barrier islands that outline many coastal communities around the world? To answer this question, scientists look at the relationship between barrier island elevation and the plant life that populates the dunes.

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Double Whammy: A Second Source of the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami

A powerful offshore earthquake was quickly identified as the source of the catastrophic 2011 Tohoku tsunami, which devastated portions of coastal Japan. Numerous studies have shown that an earthquake was not the sole contributor to the tsunami and that an unidentified tsunami source remains at large. New research has identified a second suspect.

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On the Verge: Sea Level to Emerge

What is natural and what is human induced climate change? A controversial topic indeed, determining when a natural process has been drastically altered by human activities is best left to the scientists! In this study, scientists use climate model simulations and sea level projections to estimate when human induced climate change emerges from natural variability.

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Reconstructing Regional Climate and Oceanographic Processes From Tree Rings

Researchers are using centuries of tree growth data to understand variability in upwelling, productivity and marine ecosystem health in the California Current.

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A “Jaw-dropping” Cambrian Fish!

A 500 million year old primitive fish sheds light on vertebrate evolution and the emergence of jawed fish.

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Global Warming Hiatus? Blame the Atlantic!

From the early 1990s on, the Earth has been experiencing a global warming hiatus, where the post-industrial warming trend has effectively come to a stop. Recent research has implicated strengthening Pacific trade winds as the cause of the warming hiatus. New evidence suggests the mechanism triggering the unprecedented acceleration of Pacific trade winds has its origins in the Atlantic Ocean.

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