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Archive for June, 2014

I plead the soil amendment – Improving the function of restored wetlands

Wetlands provide valuable services to humans every day, including flood protection, water purification, and shoreline stabilization to name a few. Unfortunately, restored wetlands often fall short of providing all of the services that their natural counterparts do. This study investigates ways to improve the capability of restored wetlands in removing excess nitrogen from their systems.

The oldest seawater chemically analyzed

Water water everywhere, water water always there, but how it’s changed you may not know, read this story and Spear et al. will tell you so.

Hawksbill turtles are picky about their water temperature

Hawksbill turtles leave their place of birth and then head out into the world, but they always come back to their birth site in order to lay their eggs. Their journey, however, is not a random exploration of the wild ocean, but rather a purposeful voyage, seeking the perfect temperature of water.

Could increasing CO2 be decreasing human nutrition?

The increase in global atmospheric CO2 concentrations may be causing major food crops, like wheat, to have lower amounts of the nutrients zinc and iron, causing a potential decrease in human health.

Tethered Lunch: How conditioning native predators can help control invasive species.

It’s dark. It’s silent. A small ripple appears in a glass of water. The ripple starts to grow, becoming more frequent. Next to you is a small, helpless goat tethered to a pole. You look away for a brief second and suddenly the goat has disappeared. All that’s left is one half eaten leg. This is a classic scene from Jurassic Park. Ok, so this paper isn’t about cloning dinosaurs and creating a theme park, but the tethered goat being eaten by a t-rex provides a visual for what some researchers are doing with invasive lionfish. Researchers have found that native predators can be conditioned to eat invasive species, helping create biological controls.

Need help counting bubbles? Now you can use sound!

Bubbles elicit scenes of childhood summers playing on the front stoop or backyard. On the other hand, put bubbles at the bottom of the ocean and you will find highly educated adults toiling with complicated mathematical equations and state-of-the-art technology.

Ocean Ecosystem Stressors Influence Human Health

Healthy coastal and marine environments are of great importance to human beings. They provide many ecosystem services, which are water and food supply, temperature maintenance, storm protection, recreation etc; yet currently, many of these environments are being degraded by several environmental stressors.

Tipping the Domino in East Antarctica

Researchers use modeling experiments to understand the conditions necessary for irreversible melting in East Antarctica, a region previously thought to be stable. The results of this research show that the stability of the Wilkes Basin is a mere “tip of a domino” away from runaway melting, which would result in a slow and steady global rise in sea-level.

How will climate change affect coastal fisheries production?

Forecasted impacts of climate changes on fisheries production in coastal ecosystems suggest modest changes on average with significant increases in primary production in high latitude systems and declines near the equator. Fisheries in developing nations are most at risk. However, declining productivity may be buffered by responsible management practices.

Hired Mussels: Mussel Farming to Clean Up Excess Nutrients

Plants need nitrogen and phosphorous to grow, and humans need plants to survive. In our quest to produce more and more food for more and more people, we have released immense amounts of nutrients into aquatic environments. In this study, researchers in Denmark set out to determine whether mussel farming is a cost effective way to remove excess nutrients from the water.

The pH of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre has been dropping since 1981

Has the pH of our oceans decreased significantly? Lauvset and Gruber say yes, for the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre.

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