//archives

Archive for June, 2014

I plead the soil amendment – Improving the function of restored wetlands

Wetlands provide valuable services to humans every day, including flood protection, water purification, and shoreline stabilization to name a few. Unfortunately, restored wetlands often fall short of providing all of the services that their natural counterparts do. This study investigates ways to improve the capability of restored wetlands in removing excess nitrogen from their systems. […]

The oldest seawater chemically analyzed

Water water everywhere, water water always there, but how it’s changed you may not know, read this story and Spear et al. will tell you so. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a marine research scientist who has been lucky to have had many roles in my neophyte career, including […]

Hawksbill turtles are picky about their water temperature

Hawksbill turtles leave their place of birth and then head out into the world, but they always come back to their birth site in order to lay their eggs. Their journey, however, is not a random exploration of the wild ocean, but rather a purposeful voyage, seeking the perfect temperature of water. Valeska UphamFor my […]

Could increasing CO2 be decreasing human nutrition?

The increase in global atmospheric CO2 concentrations may be causing major food crops, like wheat, to have lower amounts of the nutrients zinc and iron, causing a potential decrease in human health. Kari St.LaurentI received a Ph.D. in oceanography in 2014 from the Graduate School of Oceanography (URI) and am finishing up a post-doc at […]

Tethered Lunch: How conditioning native predators can help control invasive species.

It’s dark. It’s silent. A small ripple appears in a glass of water. The ripple starts to grow, becoming more frequent. Next to you is a small, helpless goat tethered to a pole. You look away for a brief second and suddenly the goat has disappeared. All that’s left is one half eaten leg. This […]

Need help counting bubbles? Now you can use sound!

Bubbles elicit scenes of childhood summers playing on the front stoop or backyard. On the other hand, put bubbles at the bottom of the ocean and you will find highly educated adults toiling with complicated mathematical equations and state-of-the-art technology. Sarah FullerWith academic backgrounds in oceanography, geology, and environmental education, Sarah has traveled to far […]

Ocean Ecosystem Stressors Influence Human Health

Healthy coastal and marine environments are of great importance to human beings. They provide many ecosystem services, which are water and food supply, temperature maintenance, storm protection, recreation etc; yet currently, many of these environments are being degraded by several environmental stressors. Caoxin SunCaoxin is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Oceanography at […]

Tipping the Domino in East Antarctica

Researchers use modeling experiments to understand the conditions necessary for irreversible melting in East Antarctica, a region previously thought to be stable. The results of this research show that the stability of the Wilkes Basin is a mere “tip of a domino” away from runaway melting, which would result in a slow and steady global […]

How will climate change affect coastal fisheries production?

Forecasted impacts of climate changes on fisheries production in coastal ecosystems suggest modest changes on average with significant increases in primary production in high latitude systems and declines near the equator. Fisheries in developing nations are most at risk. However, declining productivity may be buffered by responsible management practices. Lis HendersonI am studying for my […]

Hired Mussels: Mussel Farming to Clean Up Excess Nutrients

Plants need nitrogen and phosphorous to grow, and humans need plants to survive. In our quest to produce more and more food for more and more people, we have released immense amounts of nutrients into aquatic environments. In this study, researchers in Denmark set out to determine whether mussel farming is a cost effective way […]

The pH of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre has been dropping since 1981

Has the pH of our oceans decreased significantly? Lauvset and Gruber say yes, for the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre. Cathleen TurnerCat Turner is a Masters Candidate at the University of Rhode Island. Her research topic is on pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) fluctuations of Narragansett Bay, R.I. In her spare time she draws cartoons, […]

Instagram

  • by oceanbites 2 weeks ago
    Happy Earth Day! Take some time today to do something for the planet and appreciate the ocean, which covers 71% of the Earth’s surface.  #EarthDay   #OceanAppreciation   #Oceanbites   #CoastalVibes   #CoastalRI 
  • by oceanbites 2 months ago
    Not all outdoor science is fieldwork. Some of the best days in the lab can be setting up experiments, especially when you get to do it outdoors. It’s an exciting mix of problem solving, precision, preparation, and teamwork. Here is
  • by oceanbites 2 months ago
    Being on a research cruise is a unique experience with the open water, 12-hour working shifts, and close quarters, but there are some familiar practices too. Here Diana is filtering seawater to gather chlorophyll for analysis, the same process on
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #oceanbites  we are featuring Hannah Collins  @hannahh_irene  Hannah works with marine suspension feeding bivalves and microplastics, investigating whether ingesting microplastics causes changes to the gut microbial community or gut tissues. She hopes to keep working
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    Leveling up - did you know that crabs have a larval phase? These are both porcelain crabs, but the one on the right is the earlier stage. It’s massive spine makes it both difficult to eat and quite conspicuous in
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Cierra Braga. Cierra works ultraviolet c (UVC) to discover how this light can be used to combat biofouling, or the growth of living things, on the hulls of ships. Here, you
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Elena Gadoutsis  @haysailor  These photos feature her “favorite marine research so far: From surveying tropical coral reefs, photographing dolphins and whales, and growing my own algae to expose it to different
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on Oceanbites we are featuring Eliza Oldach. According to Ellie, “I study coastal communities, and try to understand the policies and decisions and interactions and adaptations that communities use to navigate an ever-changing world. Most of
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Jiwoon Park with a little photographic help from Ryan Tabata at the University of Hawaii. When asked about her research, Jiwoon wrote “Just like we need vitamins and minerals to stay
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #Oceanbites  we are featuring  @riley_henning  According to Riley, ”I am interested in studying small things that make a big impact in the ocean. Right now for my master's research at the University of San Diego,
  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Gabby Stedman. Gabby is interested in interested in understanding how many species of small-bodied animals there are in the deep-sea and where they live so we can better protect them from
  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Shawn Wang! Shawn is “an oceanographer that studies ocean conditions of the past. I use everything from microfossils to complex computer models to understand how climate has changed in the past
  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
    Today we are highlighting some of our awesome new authors for  #WriterWednesday  Today we have Daniel Speer! He says, “I am driven to investigate the interface of biology, chemistry, and physics, asking questions about how organisms or biological systems respond
  • by oceanbites 7 months ago
    Here at Oceanbites we love long-term datasets. So much happens in the ocean that sometimes it can be hard to tell if a trend is a part of a natural cycle or actually an anomaly, but as we gather more
  • by oceanbites 7 months ago
    Have you ever seen a lobster molt? Because lobsters have exoskeletons, every time they grow they have to climb out of their old shell, leaving them soft and vulnerable for a few days until their new shell hardens. Young, small
  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    A lot of zooplankton are translucent, making it much easier to hide from predators. This juvenile mantis shrimp was almost impossible to spot floating in the water, but under a dissecting scope it’s features really come into view. See the
  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    This is a clump of Dead Man’s Fingers, scientific name Codium fragile. It’s native to the Pacific Ocean and is invasive where I found it on the east coast of the US. It’s a bit velvety, and the coolest thing
  • by oceanbites 9 months ago
    You’ve probably heard of jellyfish, but have you heard of salps? These gelatinous sea creatures band together to form long chains, but they can also fall apart and will wash up onshore like tiny gemstones that squish. Have you seen
  • by oceanbites 9 months ago
    Check out what’s happening on a cool summer research cruise! On the  #neslter  summer transect cruise, we deployed a tow sled called the In Situ Icthyoplankton Imaging System. This can take pictures of gelatinous zooplankton (like jellyfish) that would be
  • by oceanbites 10 months ago
    Did you know horseshoe crabs have more than just two eyes? In these juveniles you can see another set in the middle of the shell. Check out our website to learn about some awesome horseshoe crab research.  #oceanbites   #plankton   #horseshoecrabs 
WP2Social Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com