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Archive for January, 2016

A Slick Study! Natural Oil Seeps and Chlorophyll

Oil seeps are naturally occurring sources of oil to the marine environment. This study looks at the impacts of oil seeps on chlorophyll concentrations near the surface of the ocean and the results are pretty slick!

Killer food: the harmful effects of a diatom diet

What if a single bite out of your favorite cheeseburger was toxic to your health? In the ocean, copepods are faced with this issue when they feed on certain types of diatoms. Some diatoms produce toxins as a way to defend themselves from predators. How do these toxins effect hungry copepods?

Was the California drought the worst in history?

California has seen longer droughts and drier years in the past, but a new reconstruction shows that 2012-2015 was the driest 4-year period in the last 2000 years.

Online Ocean Exploration

Anybody can explore the ocean as long as they can access the internet. Just because you can not be at sea does not mean you can not explore it! Learn more on how to explore the ocean through resources available at your fingertips!

Oh Where, Oh Where Should This Oyster Reef Go?

Where indeed? Oyster reef restoration and use for shoreline protection requires some planning to maximize effectiveness. Find out more in today’s oceanbites!

Oceanbites at the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology: Part II

This year’s annual meeting for the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology brought together over 2000 scientists to share their research. With a slew of exciting topics ranging everywhere from ecology to biomechanics, there were plenty of talks worth reporting. But, for the second post on SICB, I will share my most memorable marine talks.

Can the ocean take the heat?

Things heat up as scientists investigate deeper to find out how much heat the ocean can take.

Oceanbites at the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, Part I

The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) hosts an annual meeting in the United States. With over two thousand attendees, many of them presenting cutting-edge research that encompasses aspects of genetics, development, ecology, evolution, physiology, systematics, and biomechanics (to name just a few of the represented fields), this conference hosts a large number of interesting and relevant talks or posters. Two Oceanbites members traveled to SICB this year and decided to write summaries of some of their favorite presentations.

Mountains vs. Climate, Recorded in Marine Sediment

Mountain ranges can actively evolve with Earth’s climate. A new study of the St. Elias Range in coastal Alaska demonstrates how dynamic and coupled our planet’s crust is to climate, and how we can investigate past erosion through marine sediments.

The ocean + a blind turtle + some driftwood = lucky to be human

Today we’ll take a detour from our usual format to do a quick ‘back-of-the-envelope’ calculation about Buddhism and why being human is special.

Oxygen favours the bold

It takes personality for the African sharptooth catfishes to breathe air. But they also consider their surroundings before visiting the surface. Photo: Wikimedia.

Making Room for New Neighbors: Observing Penguin Foraging

What happens when we rely on models, only to realize we’re missing pieces of the puzzle? Climate change models predict Adélie penguins will face increased resource competition from other penguin species, but new evidence indicates modifying behavior might take some pressure off these flightless birds. Read to find out more!

Miles-deep currents seen from miles high

The system of currents that moves water and heat around the globe and regulates global climate may be slowing down. For the first time, researchers are able to track the changes from space.

The Codfathers: Holding the Keys to Success in Warming Oceans

Atlantic cod stocks have struggled to recover from overfishing for decades. Warming oceans will make a cod recovery even more difficult as the cold water fish struggle to reproduce in warmer waters. A new study in the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology examines if fathers play an important role in generating offspring that are better adapted for warmer waters.

It’s a TRAP! Predators help trap carbon in coastal sediments

Vegetated coastal ecosystems, such as salt marshes, can trap and store carbon for millennia. This perspective investigates how the effects from the global loss of predators has cascaded down to these habitats, often resulting in lower carbon storage.

Stop: Recovery Time!: Using volcanoes to model recovery of deep-sea communities

Deep sea communities are full of weird and wonderful animals that we don’t know much about, and human demand for sulfides may lead to deep sea mining near their habitat. We don’t know how they’ll respond to a disturbance, so these researchers looked at what happens after a natural disturbance: a volcanic eruption. Read on to find out what happened to the vent communities!

In the Heart of the Sea: Following the Song of Humpback Whales to Study Migration

Every year, humpback whales journey across the ocean. Using passive acoustics to study whale song, scientists are able to follow the path of humpback whales and learn about their migratory patterns. Read (and listen) to find out more!

February Theme Week Survey

Let us know what you’d like to read about in February by choosing one of the options below! Whichever topic gets the most votes will be covered by one full week of posts in February. Create your own user feedback survey Carrie McDonough I am the founder and editor-in-chief of oceanbites, and a postdoctoral fellow […]

Sea turtles vs Airguns

As we look for oil beneath the sea floor we cause a ruckus. How do sea turtles react and how can we protect them from the disturbance?

Disoriented fish are getting lost at sea!

Young fish rely on sound cues to navigate the vast ocean, but as our oceans acidify, the journey home to safely settle becomes much more difficult. Disoriented and slow, these fish are getting lost at sea

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