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Archive for April, 2016

Figure 1 - A hydrothermal vent system, maybe the source of our next medicines? Source: Wikimedia Commons

Marine life: Coming to a PharmaSea near you!

The PharmaSea program is looking to expand our library of marine-derived compounds for use in drug discovery. Want to know what marine organisms are already used in medicine, and where this program is looking to find new medicines? Read on to find out!

Source: Wikicommons

Human Activity Far More Responsible For Rising Seas Since The Mid 20th Century

New research reports a change in the primary driver of global sea level rise. Natural climate influences on sea level rise are no longer at fault, and haven’t been since the middle of the 20th century.

Bottletail squid. Credit: www.wildsingapore.com and Ria Tan.

What makes a male squid put in reproductive effort?

Male squid can vary the effort they put into each mating event. Find out what type of female makes the males put in the most energy.

Penguin-Falling

Frequent Fallers: Fat penguins have trouble staying on their feet

Yesterday was World Penguin Day. In honor of that, let’s take some time to appreciate just how awkward they are when they have to walk, and investigate why fatter penguins may fall more often.

¿Qué le sucede a la salud de los humanos cuando comemos peces que han sido alimentados con cultivos?

¿Qué le sucede a la salud de los humanos cuando comemos peces que han sido alimentados con cultivos? Translated by Sandra Schleier. Original post by MEGAN CHEN Artículo: Fry, J.P., Love, D.C., MacDonald, G.K., West, P.C., Engstrom, P.M., Nachman, K.E., Lawrence R.S., (2016). Environmental health impacts of feeding crops to farmed fish. Environmental International. 91:201-214. doi:dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2016.02.022  Introducción El […]

[url=http://www.zoochat.com/1600/little-blue-penguin-eudyptula-minor-international-208236][img]http://s3.zoochat.com.s3.amazonaws.com/medium/imgp3371-141112.jpg[/img][/url]

Little penguins have little tolerance for high temperatures

New technology lets researchers track the 3D motion of penguins in the ocean to learn exactly where they catch their food. They catch the most when water is cooler than average, which could become a problem as ocean temperatures warm.

Pretty, isn't it? "The Blue Marble" photograph of Earth, taken when the Apollo 17 mission travelled to the moon in 1972. This picture is featured on the official Earth Day Flag. [Wikimedia]

Go Green for Earth Day!

Do Mother Nature a solid with these helpful tips & tricks to go green today!

Image 5: A wide array of plastic fragments found in a freshwater river.

A Million Little Pieces….of plastic

Trillions of tiny plastic fragments are floating in the Earth’s ocean. These microplastics can attract organic pollutants, be ingested by marine organisms, and even end up in table salt. This Earth Week post gives a broad introduction to microplastics and examples of how we can all help to reduce this problem!

Figure 1: There are less fish in the sea then there were just a few decades ago. Image from World Wildlife Fund

Earth Week: Overview on Overfishing

We rely heavily on the oceans as a source of food. Unfortunately, fish populations have declined by over 50 percent over the past several decades. This can spell disaster for us and ocean ecosystems. Read on for to find out more about how we are impacting the oceans through overfishing.

Figure 2: intricate root system https-//pixabay.com/en/mangrove-philippines-trees-nature-1227352/

Room to Grow

When natural ecosystems are destroyed from anthropogenic development there exists a common notion that a replacement can be replanted somewhere else. One has to wonder though; what if the ecosystem destroyed cannot be replaced into the same role it once had. Scientists investigate if planted mangroves in the Philippines change the natural mangrove areas surrounding the restoration area, and to determine if there are differences in species diversity between planted and natural systems.

Juvenile Chinook salmon were monitored in this study. While adult salmon are known to travel far into the open ocean, these salmon were young enough that they had not yet traveled far from their spawning grounds, meaning that chemicals found inside the fish were likely from local sources. (Source: Wikimedia Commons).

Spawning Under the Influence: Drugs and Toxins Found in Salmon

You may think you’re familiar with the side effects of most common medications, but there are other, hidden side effects occurring beneath the surfaces of our oceans, lakes, and rivers. In this study, researchers brought these side effects to light by measuring a wide range of pharmaceuticals, drugs, and other manmade chemicals, in fish from Puget Sound.

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La Importancia de los Erizos

La Importancia de los erizos Diadema antillarum: Un vistazo de la investigación de VALESKA UPHAM Translated by Sandra Schleier– Original Post by VALESKA UPHAM Introducción a los erizos Muchas personas consideran los erizos, en especial el erizo negro de espinas largas, Diadema antillarum (Figura 1), una molestia e incluso les tienen miedo. Yo no los culpo, no solamente duele increíblemente […]

Credit: Gérald Tapp.

Iceberg Buffet: How giant icebergs bring food to plankton

While icebergs are calving from Antarctic glaciers at alarming rates, they may provide a negative feedback for the carbon cycle. Giant icebergs bring large amounts of iron to iron-poor areas of the Southern Ocean, stimulating primary productivity and boosting carbon sequestration.

A snapping shrimp seen here with a mutualist friend, a goby. Photo by: Haplochromis - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=880768

Going Mute: Ocean acidification silences shrimp snaps

Coastal areas could fall silent in the next century as ocean acidification alters and affects the natural soundscapes of the oceans. Intrigued? Click here to read more!

Microscope image of dust particles (Creative Commons)

Dust detectives: tracing the origins of Antarctic ice core debris

Tiny dust particles punch above their weight by delivering nutrients to remote ecosystems. A new study uses the chemical fingerprint of dust particles to retrace their origins and how this important process has changed over the last 800,000 years. Read on to learn more!

EmanuelCountyLive.com

Beat the Heat: Predicting Eastern U.S. Hot Days using the Pacific Ocean

Get ready for summer! Scientists have found a new way to predict the extremely hot days that occur throughout summer, using rainfall over land and the temperature of the Pacific Ocean. Read on to learn more!

polynyas

Plankton fill up ice-free summer homes

Source: Li, Y., R. Ji, S. Jenouvrier, M. Jin, and J. Stroeve (2016), Synchronicity between ice retreat and phytoplankton bloom in circum-Antarctic polynyas, Geophys. Res. Lett., 43, 2086–2093, doi:10.1002/2016GL067937. Antarctic coasts Despite the dark winters and freezing cold conditions, the coastline of Antarctica is a hotspot for growth of phytoplankton, the tiny, photosynthesizing organisms that […]

just_coral

Coral! At The Disco: Using fluorescence (and computer science) to label reef data

A group of scientists and engineers have leveraged two emerging technologies to develop a new system for studying coral in their natural habitat. The team dramatically improved automatic labeling of coral images by combining a novel camera set up with powerful machine learning techniques. The result is fast, accurate, and has the potential to change how coral ecologists do their research.

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Oceanbites Theme Week Survey: May 2016

Please vote for next month’s theme so we can write about a topic that you want to know more about!

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The importance of sea urchins

A look into Valeska’s graduate research. Why coral reefs depend on the long spined black sea urchin for survival.

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