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Archive for May, 2016

Wave the Yellow Flag

While the blue flag iris is native to United States wetlands, the yellow variety is invasive and just starting to pop up on the radar of concern for land managers. This study found that seed dispersal was the main reproduction tactic, which was unique since asexual reproduction from rhizome pieces breaking off is the common […]

Vamos a Despertar: ¡¡¡Nuestros Océanos están en Peligro!!!

Translated by Sandra scheier ORIGINAL POST BY SEAN ANDERSON El reporte: Living Blue Planet Report 2015 (WWF) El estado actual de nuestros océanos En un intento de prender el botón de pánico, la WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature) publicó un reporte sobre la salud de nuestros océanos. ¿Cuál es el veredicto final? Nuestra población continúa expandiendo (7.3 […]

Honey, we shrunk the seafood

Atlantic surfclams have gotten smaller over the last thirty years. This modeling study explores how temperature and how we fish can change the average size of individuals in a population. Sarah GiltzI am a doctoral candidate in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Tulane University. My research focuses on the larval dispersal and development of the […]

When life gives you dead mussels, make…lobsters?

Many industries have been trying to figure out how to make their waste products into useful raw materials for other products. Read on to find out how mussel aquaculture could contribute to your next lobster dinner! Erin McLeanHi and welcome to oceanbites! I recently finished my master’s degree at URI, focusing on lobsters and how […]

Bringing Down the Fever: Sea Star Wasting Disease

Sea stars have been wasting away–literally! Outbreaks of this poorly understood disease have been noticed many times in the last century, and now, a new study has come out trying to understand the potential for sea stars to survive this threat. Intrigued? Click here to read more! Andrea SchlunkI am a former PhD student from […]

Aliens attack: Predicting the spread of marine invasive species

Species invasions have become serious issues in the marine environment, mostly as a result of increased ship traffic. Once a new species invades an area, it is next to impossible to draw it out. What if there was a way to predict the arrival of alien species to new locations in the ocean? Would this […]

Inked and Eaten: how squid have adapted a defense mechanism to help them capture prey

Just when we thought squids couldn’t get any cooler, researchers have discovered that squid use ink clouds not just to help them escape from predators, but to be predators themselves! Read on to find out how. Gordon OberPostdoctoral Researcher, Claremont McKenna College I am currently a postdoc at Keck Sciences, Claremont McKenna College. I work […]

Not all freshwater is created equal

Glacial runoff, precipitation, and sea ice melt all contribute to the freshwater content of the upper ocean along the west Antarctic Peninsula. Using oxygen isotope samples from water found in different areas of the continental shelf, researchers were able map the areas where different sources of freshwater are more important. Nicole CoutoI’m interested in how […]

What’s in the Hair of a Polar Bear?

The accumulation of toxic methylmercury is a serious threat to wildlife all over the world – especially top predators in polar regions, like polar bears. Young polar bears are often the most vulnerable to detrimental effects of pollutants. To learn more about levels of mercury in polar bear cubs and their mothers, scientists measured total […]

National Ocean Policy: a look inside Congress

Ever wondered what your government does for the oceans? Here’s a brief glimpse. Zoe GentesZoe has an M.S. in Oceanography and a B.S. in Geologic Oceanography from URI, with a minor in Writing and Rhetoric. She was recently a Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in the US House of Representatives, and now work at Consortium for […]

Pez– Padre animal de año, 2016

Translated by Sandra Schleier, original post by: DINA NAVON Vamos hablar de sexo (en los peces) Cuando escucho las palabras “cuidado parental” dentro del reino animal, mi mente corre a cachorros de lobos en su madrigueras siendo cuidados por sus tías y tíos o bebes pingüinos emperadores sentados a los pies de papá como la película de […]

Why iron fertilization hasn’t worked

Fertilizing the ocean with iron to help algae store more carbon in the deep sea was once heralded as a solution for global warming. But decades of research has suggested it doesn’t work as advertised. What went wrong? Read on to find out! Michael PhilbenI recently completed a PhD in Marine Science at the University […]

Wasting Away in Virus-ville

Sea star wasting disease still plagues the U.S. West Coast, but clues to its nature are being uncovered. Find out how temperature may be a key player in the progression of the disease in today’s article! Austen BlairAusten Blair is a MS candidate at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. While his […]

12,000 feet under the sea, from space

A pair of scientists have figured out how to track deep ocean currents using gravity measurements from space. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s role in climate. For my research I sometimes spend months at sea […]

Double, double methane and trouble: Quantifying natural and man-made methane seeps

Researchers from Texas A&M and Woods Hole tested out a new, 3D camera system designed to look at deep sea methane seeps. The high resolution, high frame rate videos yielded new insights into bubble dynamics that could influence how we respond to oil and gas spills. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps […]

How fish can help design better filters

This new study takes a closer look at the fluid dynamics happening inside filter-feeding fishes. How might this save industries valuable time and money? Read more to find out! Megan ChenI graduated with a Masters of Coastal & Marine Management from the University of Akureyri in Iceland, and am currently working at the Smithsonian Institution’s […]

June 2016 Theme Week Survey

Here at OceanBites, we–the writers–like to know what you want to read! For one week each month, we write posts related to a topic of your choosing. Please vote for what you’d like to hear about in June! And if you have suggestions for future themes, share them in the comments! Thank you! Create your […]

Plant Parents: Divide, Seed, and Conquer

Phragmites is the ultimate parent in terms of reproductive success, allowing it to increase in area by 25% since 1971 in the Rhode River subestuary. While phragmites can spread asexually through rhizome clones, seed dispersion requiring two parents was the most successful tactic found in this study. Kari St.LaurentI received a Ph.D. in oceanography in […]

Parenthood: The Most Rewarding Experience or The Ultimate Sacrifice?

Our human parents make a lot of sacrifices for us! They devote their time and energy, provide for us, invest in us (monetarily, sure, but also emotionally), nurture us, attempt to teach us, make career decisions with us in mind, and lose a lot of sleep worrying about us. However, in the marine world things […]

Why Mom Cares.

Does mom care? If you are a skink from the wrong neighborhood she might, otherwise, you are on your own kid. Read about the evolution of paternal care traits in one skink population that is not observed in the others! Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a marine research scientist […]

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