//archives

Archive for October, 2016

independence

The Rebirth of the “Mighty-I”

Happy Halloween! This is the true, spooky tale of life, death, and rebirth beneath the waves. To end off OceanBites’ haunting Halloween theme week, read the story of USS Independence – an aircraft carrier that participated in atomic bomb trials at Bikini Atoll.

Feliz Día de las Brujas desde el Mundo Marino: ¡Las 5 Criaturas más horripilantes y espantosas del Océano!

¡Feliz Dia de Las Brujas! Espero que disfruten de esta edición especial de OceanBites En Español… ¡Las 5 Criaturas más espantosas del Océano! Translated BY Sandra Schleier, original post BY DINA NAVON ⋅ #5 – Pez Ojo de Barril ¡O sea, mira esa cara! Eso sí es un pez triste, con los ojos melancólicos y labios derribados. […]

Fig. 3. Entangled Sea Turtle. Source: NOAA.

Let’s Ghost Fishing for Halloween!

Ghost fishing is ghastly because it creates underwater graveyards for wildlife. The authors covered here wrote a new review of gear entanglement among mammals, reptiles, and sharks. Find out what they discovered by reading today’s post!

From pixabay: https://pixabay.com/p-997907/?no_redirect

Ghost ships, adorable flotsam, and measuring surface currents

The ocean is teeming with floating objects. Some of them are creepy, rusted, abandoned boats. Others are cute little bath toys. All are nerdy Halloween costumes waiting to happen! Not to mention their utility as oceanographic tools to learn about currents.

Fig.1: A decorator crab, Oregonia gracilis, costumed by seaweeds, sponges, bryozoans, and probably a lot else! (Photo: Flickr user Rick)

Costume Age: some crabs are too young to start dressing up

Well, it’s that time of year again where hoards of costumed kids roam the streets in search of candy. While these kids are met at each door with smiles and sugar, older kids and teenagers are more likely to be met with disapproving frowns – aren’t they too old to be doing this? Well, if you’re a decorator crab you also like to go all out in costume, but it’s not the younger crabs that are doing it, decorator crabs have to be a certain age before they start dressing up!

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Marine Halloween: Creepiest Looking Critters

In honor of our Marine Halloween theme, this month I’ll be presenting my picks for the creepiest looking marine critters, à la Buzzfeed. Counting down from 5:

Sperm whales traveling in a pod. Source: Gabriel Barathieu on Wikimedia Commons.

A Junkyard in the Belly of a Whale

A candy wrapper, plastic bags, car parts, packing materials, and fishing gear… it sounds like a list of things you might come across at a landfill or a junkyard, but actually it’s what researchers have found in the bellies of sperm whales. Scientists from Germany, the Netherlands, and France went searching to find out what’s in the belly of a whale, but they didn’t find Pinocchio. Instead, they found a slew of marine debris discarded from human activities.

Fish Market (Credit: Jim, Flickr, CC-BY-SA)

Why do restaurants join sustainable seafood labelling programs?

Why do some restaurants join sustainable seafood eco-labeling programs? A new study identifies some motivating factors that can help the continued expansion of these programs to enhance their ability to harness consumer demand and encourage positive change in seafood production.

Blubber from stranded common bottlenose dolphins was used in this research. Common bottlenose dolphins are globally distributed and are considered an apex marine predator. Credit: NASA - http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=21807, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37679800

Rachel Carson had the right idea: DDT persists in unexpected ways in dolphins

Rachel Carson was right to focus her novel on the effects of DDT; DDT persists to this day in dolphins off the California coast in forms that are often not monitored by monitoring programs.

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Germ Stowaways: How Plastic Waste Has Become an Environment for Harmful Bacteria

For over 100 years, plastic has been integrated into our everyday lives. It has been used to make life better for humans in many ways (medical research, food preservation, sterile laboratory devices, etc.). But, as we accumulate more, disposal has become a problem. While plastic waste is a problem in its own right, new research is finding that this waste is capable of harboring harmful bacteria and transporting it over great distances.

A view from my outdoor office at the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve.

Bon Voyage to Oceanbites

Oceanbites has been an incredible experience. Today is my goodbye post and my thank you to the readers and Oceanbites contributors!

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The Antarctic Peninsula is cooling… for now

Temperature records from the Antarctic Peninsula show that the region has been cooling since the end of the 20th century. But the story is much more complicated than that. Temperatures in the Antarctic are extremely variable, and these findings only highlight the climate drivers that lead to that variability

La larga y peligrosa migración de las Anguilas Europeas

Translated by Sandra Schleier Original Post by  ABRAHIM EL GAMAL Artículo: David Righton, Håkan Westerberg,2 Eric Feunteun, Finn Økland, Patrick Gargan, Elsa Amilhat, Julian Metcalfe, Javier Lobon-Cervia, Niklas Sjöberg, Janek Simon, Anthony Acou, Marisa Vedor, Alan Walker, Thomas Trancart, Uwe Brämick, Kim Aarestrup. Empirical observations of the spawning migration of European eels: The long and dangerous […]

Figure 1: Oilrig and platform locations in the North and Irish Seas. (Taken from Todd et al. (2016) Figure 1.)

Oil rigs, the food trucks of the sea?

We humans don’t always take time to assess how we impact other environments; more often we survey before we enter the ecosystem, but what happens when we leave? Oil rigs in the North Sea have provided a great opportunity for scientists to start investigating. Click here to find out more!

Eine kleine Aalchaos.

The long and winding Eel migration

A glimpse of the thousands’ mile migration of the European eel shows it’s anything but straightforward.

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Tide records could have underestimated global sea level rise

New analysis of 100 years of sea level measurements from tide gauges show that we might be underestimating the global rate of sea level rise.

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Seahorses Don’t Like It Hot

Scientists have been doing a lot of work recently trying to figure out how species are going to react to climate change. This research group wanted to figure out just how much heat seahorses could take…and seeing as they can’t get out of the ocean, things aren’t looking good. Read on!

whalebone

Big animals face big trouble in our oceans

Many believe we are in the midst of another mass extinction both on land and in the ocean. What marine animals are most at risk of extinction? Using current and past extinction data, researchers were able to pinpoint the most vulnerable types of marine animals.

Super Typhoon Nina approaching the Philippines, 1987. Image produced from NOAA data. Credit: NOAA, wikipedia.

A Cluster of Typhoons: Intensification over the last three decades

Tropical Cyclones in the western Pacific Ocean have been intensifying in recent decades, but different data sets and methodologies made it hard to create accurate comparisons and models. Researchers adjusted these data sets to find that cyclones that make landfall are intensifying at faster rates than those that stay in the open ocean, and that the intensification is tied to rising ocean temperature.

One of the suspects, the member of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, produce the neurotoxin domoic acid [Wikimedia Commons]

Do algal blooms kill whales?

Since 2005, southern right whale calves have been found dead in historic numbers off the Patagonian coast in Argentina. Scientists investigate whether harmful algal blooms may be to blame.

oceanbites photostream

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