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Archive for November, 2016

Ocean mapping on a budget

The seafloor is complex and mapping it is difficult because direct observations are hindered because it is underwater. Scientists have developed field methods and remote sensing methods to model the geomorphology of the seafloor but they are either limited spatially or by resolution. A newer method being applied to seafloor mapping is called Structure from Motion, and its low cost and high resolution may play a big role in future projects regarding ocean exploration. Read more to find out how scientists used it to increase the accuracy of rugosity measurements on a Hawaiian coral reef.

Gracias Océano: El agradecimiento de los escritores y esta traductora

Translated by Sandra Schleier, Original Post by Rebecca Flynn Este es el fin de semana de Acción de Gracia, pero pienso que el espíritu de agradecimiento debe mantenerse vivo y muchos de mis colegas aquí en Oceanbites están de acuerdo. Esta semana escuchamos las razones para ser agradecidos hacia al océano de Megan, La travesía […]

7 razones para darle gracias a nuestro Océano

Translated by Sandra Schleier, Original Post by Megan Chen   Buscan la palabra “océano” en Google y la mayoría de las imágenes que salen son o de una expansión plana de la superficie del mar o una playa de arena blanca sin señales de vida. En la realidad, el 90% del espacio habitable en nuestro planeta […]

Giving Thanks for the Ocean: The gratitude of the writers

Today is the day after Thanksgiving, but I think the spirit of gratitude should live on. Many of the other writers wanted to share their gratitude for the ocean. Some waxed poetic, some pragmatic, but all spoke from a personal place. Yet the gratitude we feel for the ocean unifies all of us—not just the writers here at oceanbites but also the larger us, aka humans.

The sappiest oceanbites article you may ever read: one author’s ponderings about gratitude for the oceans

When I first saw the email stating that the oceanbites theme week would revolve around why we are thankful for the oceans, my mind flew back to my grade school celebration of the first Thanksgiving. We dressed up as Pilgrims and Native Americans, ate traditional dishes from the first Thanksgiving, and lined up to state […]

The ocean is my cake

Or, to be more thematically appropriate, pie. Pumpkin pie. Because, if we’re being honest, pumpkin pie is the superior Thanksgiving pie. [Editor’s note: This is merely the author’s opinion. Clearly, chocolate pudding pie is the superior Thanksgiving pie]

Rocky Beauty Nestled in Salem Sound

Thanksgiving is a time for reflection and gratitude. This month, I want to talk about my own journey with the oceans.

7 Reasons to Give Thanks For Our Ocean

This Thanksgiving, let’s give pause and reflect on reasons to be thankful for the ocean!

What Does the US Election Mean for Our Oceans?

The oceans are subject to the whims of national policy, and yet they know no borders. Being poor ocean stewards here in the US could cause serious problems all over the world, as well as affecting the smidgeon of blue we can see from our shores. In this post, I outline a few ideas about how America’s new political landscape might affect ocean science and the future health of our global oceans .

Microbes: The original organic cleaning agents

Natural and human caused leakage of oil into the environment is commonplace throughout the world. Scientists are learning how microbes (microscopic organisms) can break down this oil and use it for energy. By understanding these processes, we will be able to determine the short and long-term environmental impacts, as well as use these organisms to help us clean up after a major spill.

A Whale Shaped Needle in a Ocean Sized Haystack

Sperm whales are very large, but they can still be tricky to find in the ocean! These researchers combined several data sets, from centuries old whaling records to modern automated location recording, to determine the locations off the southwest Australia most suitable for sperm whales, so policy makers can plan to protect these animals and other scientists can save time searching for them.

Melting ice shelves could be slowing down ocean circulation: Elephant seals lend a flipper to find out

Wanted: Antarctic researchers to study the formation of deep water in the coastal Antarctic seas. Job requirements: Plenty of blubber and a healthy appetite for bottom-dwelling sea creatures.

Long-lived sharks challenge ageing theory

Greenland sharks can live to be over 400 years old. What can they tell us about ageing?

When Pigs Get Crabs: A Story of Symbiosis

Excerpt: The deep sea is not an easy place to live. Cold, dark, and featureless, it doesn’t provide a lot of food or hiding spots for the animals that live there. Read on to find out the odd way one species of crab has evolved to avoid both problems!

With A Little Help From My Friend: Unexpected benefits of invasive species?

Invasive species are widely talked about as unequivocally bad influences on ecosystems, but oftentimes their interactions are more complex. Click here to read more about an unexpected interplay between two mussel species in the intertidal zone!

December ’16 Theme Week Survey

Let our writers know what you want us to cover for a week during December!

The Pacific Pacemaker: Using Models to Explain Warming Hiatus

While the Earth’s mean surface temperature is slowly increasing, there are occasional, temporary slowdowns in the overall trend. The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation, a strong, varying climate pattern, may be held accountable for the phenomenon.

Positive real estate outlook for Antarctic krill

An Australian research team predict future sea-ice habitats for Antarctic krill larvae, and are surprised to find more suitable ice habitats in the future, despite shrinking sea-ice cover.

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