//archives

Archive for September, 2017

To Cull or Not to Cull: Determining Attitudes Towards Shark Mitigation Strategies

Opinions are like…well, you know…everyone’s got them. But how can we use what people think to make better decisions? Researchers in this study investigated beachgoers’ attitudes towards different methods to deter sharks from public beaches, in hoping that their opinions would reveal where we should most target education programs going forward. Read on to find […]

Science Behind the Scenes: The Corps of Exploration on the Exploration Vessel Nautilus

What kind of people does it take to do research out at sea? Oceanbites writers Ashley Marranzino and Megan Chen participated in a research cruise aboard the Exploration Vessel Nautilus and asked the Corps of Exploration! Megan ChenI graduated with a Masters of Coastal & Marine Management from the University of Akureyri in Iceland, and […]

Science Behind the Scenes: A Tour of the Exploration Vessel Nautilus

What is it really like to do research out at sea? Last month oceanbites writers Megan Chen and Ashley Marranzino participated in a research cruise aboard the Exploration Vessel Nautilus – watch a special behind the scenes video blog to see a tour of the ship! Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University […]

the Soul of an Octopus by Sy Montgomery

The soul of an octopus: a surprising exploration into the wonder of consciousness by Sy Montgomery is a excellent non-fiction story about getting the author’s experience getting to know herself and the world around her through the unexpected bonds with octopuses. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a marine research […]

How to clean a sea turtle

Could you imagine if you had to actively seek out showering stations to stay clean? For sea turtles, they must search for cleaning stations. Katherine BarrettKate is a 3rd year PhD candidate in the Biological Sciences Department at the University of Notre Dame, and holds a Masters in Environmental Science & Biology from SUNY Brockport. […]

Riding the phage wave: Emerging role of viruses in the ocean

Viruses live in the ocean, where they infect bacteria who also live in the ocean. Ocean viruses are crucial to the ecosystem, but we don’t know very much about how they ‘survive’ in the ocean. Scientists used data from samples collected all over the world, and explored what types of viruses were in these samples. […]

More than just a game of tag: learning about seabird habitat use through tagging studies

Tagging seabirds has only been possible with recent developments in technology, but we can learn a ton about their distribution and behavior through tagging studies. Read on to hear how it is done! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann Lab. […]

New Evidence of Erosion, Weathering and CO2 Together Regulating Glacier Formation

Ice cover on earth extends and recedes over thousands of years. But what drives these fluctuations? Moreover, what guarantees that our planet never settles into a single permanent state? Using samples of water from glaciers, Torres and his colleagues show that chemical reactions occurring on rocks might hold part of the answer. Julia DohnerJulia is […]

Observing Ocean Clarity from Space

A Secchi Disk is a simple tool used to measure water transparency and has been used for over 100 years! One thing water transparency can tell us if there is enough light available for primary production. Recently satellite data has been adapted to monitor ocean water transparency as well. Researchers in this study used a […]

E’rybody move to yer left

Particulate matter shows up everywhere in oceanography: remote sensing, paleoceanography, climate studies…the list goes on and on. Despite how often particles show up in the literature, very little is known about how this matter is effected by the motion of the water it is immersed. A new study out of Harbor Branch demonstrates they may […]

Return from the deep: three-dimensional pathways of upwelling in the Southern Ocean

A group of scientists mapped the pathways of deep water to the sea surface in three-dimensions for the first time, finding that most upwelling happens at key spots of swirling eddies near undersea ridges and mountains. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on […]

The G.O.A.T. of sharks: Where is the greatest of all hammerhead sharks going?

The great hammerhead is one of the most interesting yet illusive large coastal shark species. Herein, we review recent work aimed at identifying where this species is residing and moving to promote better management and conservation measures. Carolyn WheelerI am currently a PhD student studying marine science at the University of Massachusetts Boston, with my […]

Tsunami Hunt: Studying Subduction Zone Faults for Preparedness

Destructive tsunamis pose profound hazards to both big and small coastal communities. The 2011 Japan tsunami originated from a subduction zone that also hosted an adjacent, normal-fault. Researchers have identified a subduction zone segment with similar characteristics off the coast of Alaska, and sought to learn more about how the sea floor there may generate […]

Aliens in the kelp forests – community ecology and Miso soup

In the plant world, competition between species is almost always over space. Space dictates how much sunlight, nutrients, and potential mates you have access to. In community ecology, it’s thought that ecosystems only have so much space to offer different species, with some ecosystems containing more space than others. Most systems are also thought to be saturated so that, […]

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