//archives

Archive for October, 2017

Marine Halloween: Crabs Dress Up To Trick-or-Treat

Dressing up is a Halloween tradition. In the ocean, some animals ‘dress up’ to trick their predators or go unnoticed by their treats (prey).  Read more about how these creeping crabs get into the Halloween spirit year round. Megan ChenI graduated with a Masters of Coastal & Marine Management from the University of Akureyri in […]

Talking to your teen about climate change

Do you remember having “the talk” with your parents? No, not the birds and the bees – the talk about climate change. Didn’t have that one? Neither do most people. This new paper suggests that conversations around the dinner table could increase climate change mitigation behavior in teens. Read on to find out more! Erin […]

Popping bubbles: Measuring nitrogen fixation in the ocean

Scientists have been measuring nitrogen fixation in the ocean wrong – but a new method offers a simple fix. Michael GrawI’m a 5th year PhD student at Oregon State University researching the microbial ecology of marine sediments – why do we find microbes where they are in the seafloor, and what are they doing there? […]

How to model climate change in an Arctic food web

The climate is changing, and so are Arctic food webs. But our knowledge of how food webs respond to warmer Arctic water temperatures is incomplete, so scientists use models to help further understanding of future food web scenarios. Katherine BarrettKate is a 3rd year PhD candidate in the Biological Sciences Department at the University of […]

Small but mighty: the importance of forage fish to larger marine creatures

Forage fish like menhaden or capelin are vital to the health of larger marine animals; read on to learn how researchers from the University of Manitoba looked into just how important forage fish are to a northwestern Atlantic food web! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate […]

The Subtle Response of Plants to Rising CO2 Levels

Plants need carbon dioxide. What do they do when there’s more and more of it in the atmosphere? Julia DohnerJulia is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. Her focus is on biogeochemistry, which, as the name suggests, centers on the combined effects of biological, geological and chemical processes on […]

Going nuclear: radioisotopes from Fukushimi power plant stay in sand for years

Nuclear power plants are often located along coasts. In 2011, one of these power plants, Fukushima Daiichi, was hit by a tsunami. Nuclear meltdown ensued, and radioactive elements were released into the environment. Now, a group of scientists found a new reservoir of radioactive materials left from this accident. Sandy beaches up to 100 km […]

Mussel and flow

Mussels are nearly ubiquitous in coastal ecosystems. As filter feeders, they are critical for sifting out sediment and nutrients washed into the ocean from land. Despite their importance, scientists have only recently begun to tease out how mussels manage to efficiently get all that stuff into their shells. The answer could have far reaching implications […]

Your worldview: how values influence support of renewable energy

There are a lot of moving parts to consider when developing renewable energy projects. Read more to learn how people’s perceptions and primary values influence their opinion (and voting stance) on environmental projects in their community. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. I […]

Making waves in the Southern Ocean

Scientists from the Applied Physics Laboratory in Seattle tested a wave-powered ocean robot in the treacherous, turbulent waters of the Drake Passage for the first time in the name of science. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and […]

Local disturbance and global warming unite to make seagrasses taste better to predators

Seagrasses form some of the most important habitats in the marine world. Under threat from global climate change as well as local disturbances, they’re also the subject of wide-spread investigation. Field and laboratory studies have shown that nutrient pollution, temperature changes, acidification, and other disturbances will negatively affect seagrass health, at the individual and community […]

Subscribe to oceanbites

@oceanbites on Twitter