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Archive for November, 2017

MAC-EXP: A new sediment corer designed to maintain in situ pressure conditions

The MAC-EXP, a pressure-coring experimentation and cultivation system, was designed to advance our ability to analyze the microbial processes in the deep-sea sediments, which is typically a challenge because the pressure change upon recovery can alter the in situ state. Jackson et al. (2017) describe the result of the systems first field trials. Anne M. […]

That idea doesn’t suck: Hitchiking fish inspires a robotic suction disk

How do scientists build better suction cups? Turn to nature’s hitchikers for inspiration! Read on to see how remoras inspired a robotic suction disc that does a great job of sucking! Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island where I studied the sensory biology of deep-sea fishes. I am now […]

Fantastic Invaders and Where to Find Them (Galapagos Edition)

Alien species are a commonly known and growing global concern. Increasingly transported to new locations and often following significant and increasingly widespread environmental degradation in their new homes, it seems more and more aliens are making the transition from visitor to invasive species. Some invaders, usually predators, can become particularly competitive and contribute directly or […]

My Gratitude for Science is as Deep and Wide as the Oceans

Happy Thanksgiving! This year, I am grateful for more things than I can count, but two are the ocean and science. Read on and I will tell you why! Rebecca FlynnI am a graduate of the University of Notre Dame (B.S.) and the University of Rhode Island (M.S.). I now work in southwest Florida, contributing […]

A blanket of oil: the role of bacteria in cleaning up after Deepwater Horizon

Nearly one million barrels of oil landed on the seafloor after the Deepwater Horizon spill – a feast if bacteria are able to consume it. Michael GrawI’m a 5th year PhD student at Oregon State University researching the microbial ecology of marine sediments – why do we find microbes where they are in the seafloor, […]

Beyond word of mouth: How local knowledge can fill fisheries data gaps

How can we accurately assess the extent of population declines in marine organisms? Read on to find out how local and traditional knowledge can inform future fisheries management by recounting past experiences. Katherine BarrettKate is a 3rd year PhD candidate in the Biological Sciences Department at the University of Notre Dame, and holds a Masters […]

Just breathe…OR NOT: Mercury from hydrothermal vents in bubbles and the air

Mercury is a toxic element that can accumulate in marine organisms, including fish we eat. But how does mercury into marine environments? Here we talk about the findings from Bagnato et al., who found lots of mercury coming from hydrothermal systems, and that it could transfer from the water to the air! Laura ZinkeI am […]

What happens to CO2 levels during El Niño?

Thanks to NASA’s new Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 satellite, we now know when and where CO2 levels change during El Niño, and can pinpoint the culprit of rising CO¬2 levels during El Niño events. Julia DohnerJulia is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. Her focus is on biogeochemistry, which, as […]

The Accidental Shark Researcher

Want to know more about getting started in shark research? Check out the story of Marianne Porter, an “accidental” shark researcher at Florida Atlantic University! Karla HaiatI’m an Undergraduate student at University of Rhode Island majoring in Ocean Engineering and Marine Biology. I’m interested in the intersection between technology, biology and ocean exploration, as well […]

Green vs. Blue: How Green Turtles Might Limit Blue Carbon Storage

Green turtle populations are on the rise, which is a good thing, right? There has been recent concern that the increasing population will negatively impact seagrass role in blue carbon sequestration. Researchers found that turtles are decreasing the rate of carbon uptake into sediment but seagrass meadows remain active carbon sinks. Victoria TreadawayI am a […]

Mixing it up in the Southern Ocean

A team of scientists used underwater ocean gliders to measure ocean turbulence and mixing along the Antarctic continental slope and their results are changing our understanding of the 3-dimensional circulation of the Southern Ocean. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern […]

Oceanic Outlook in the New Government Climate Report

Ocean warming, acidification, sea-level-rise, and increased coastal storm intensities are just some of the stark projections highlighted in a recently-released U.S. Government climate report. Zoe GentesZoe has an M.S. in Oceanography and a B.S. in Geologic Oceanography from URI, with a minor in Writing and Rhetoric. She was recently a Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in […]

December 2017 Theme Week Survey

Hi, Readers! We would like to dedicate one week in December to cover a topic of interest to you! Please choose the theme you’d like us to cover!  If you’d like to suggest a topic for a future theme, drop it in the Comments. Thank you! The Oceanbites Team Create your own user feedback survey […]

It’s a whale, it’s a shark… No, it’s a whale shark!!

Whale sharks are pelagic gentle giants that attract many tourists to their aggregation sites, however, there is not much information on their mobile nature. Read on to learn about their aggregations in the Philippines. Article: Araujo, G., Snow, S., So, C. L., Labaja, J., Murray, R., Colucci, A., & Ponzo, A. (2017). Population structure, residency patterns […]

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