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Archive for March, 2018

Danger in the deep: uncovering the vertical movement patterns of vulnerable deep-sea sharks

Deep-sea sharks are one of the most poorly studied groups of animals on the planet, yet, their populations are highly threatened by fisheries bycatch. Scientists in The Bahamas develop new field approaches to begin unearthing the vertical movements of a vulnerable deep-sea shark, the Cuban dogfish, and their findings from could help significantly reduce fisheries […]

Tracking predators in seagrass beds

Scientists have long recognized that predators are more abundant at lower compared to higher latitudes. Read more to find out how a group of marine ecologists investigated the importance of predator-prey interactions in seagrass beds. Katherine BarrettKate is a 4th year PhD candidate in the Biological Sciences Department at the University of Notre Dame, and […]

Effects may vary

For the past several decades, satellite data has indicated that our ocean’s height is on the rise. But little effort has gone to looking at this trend, in detail, at the local level. Dr. Benjamin Hamlington argues that such local changes are highly variable and have consequences for people planning for future coastal management. Eric […]

2018 Society for Women In Marine Science Spring Symposium

This past Saturday, the Society for Women in Marine Science URI chapter hosted their first spring symposium.  The event offered active discussion about issues relevant in science while encouraging the participation and success of women in marine sciences. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a marine research scientist who has […]

Megalodon: a puzzle piece to understanding ecological concerns around apex predator extinction

A Prehistoric Nightmare? The Megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon), or “big tooth” is arguably one of the scariest creatures that has ever roamed the ocean. You may have heard about the Megalodon as a prehistoric gigantic shark that dominated the ocean millions of years ago, or even that scientists are still looking for them today, just like […]

Tracking Global Fisheries with the Help of Computer Neural Networks

Fisheries are vital to global economies and to the billions of people who rely on fish for their primary source of protein. How do we track and manage these fisheries? Read how a new study looks at the global footprint of fisheries and analyzes what drives this market. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from […]

Around the Antarctic in 17 Years

The transport of water from the deep ocean to the surface has many important impacts on global climate. By releasing virtual particles into climate models and tracking the pathways they take to reach the surface, this study finds that upwelling occurs much more quickly than previously thought. This result has implications for long-term climate projections. […]

The Many Modes of Antarctic Ice Loss

The Western Antarctic Ice Shelf has been melting rapidly in recent decades, largely due to upwelling of deep ocean water that has been gradually warming. Atmospheric systems can influence the ice-sheet height anomalies on interannual time scales. Paolo and other researchers used satellite altimetry to study which processes have the greatest effect in one region […]

More Intense Summer to Winter Swings in Oceanic Dissolved CO2

Ocean CO2 levels vary depending on the time of year. Landschützer and his colleagues are the first to show that human-emitted CO2 is making these seasonal swings more severe, potentially to the detriment of many marine organisms. Julia DohnerJulia is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. Her focus is […]

Coming Home to Roost: A case of parasites relying on ancestral DNA to take advantage of a new penguin host species?

Parasites are nasty and resilient organisms, often highly specialized to fit their hosts. But sometimes, nature allows a bit of wiggle room, opportunity strikes, and new species find themselves vulnerable to these unwelcome houseguests. This could be what has happened to Magellanic penguins. Curious to learn more? Click here! Andrea SchlunkI am a former PhD […]

Agricultural Stewardship Could Prevent Invasive Species Takeover Downstream

  Phragmites australis, or Common Reed, is a marine grass likely introduced to North America from Eurasia in the late 1800s through the garden trade. It has since become one of the most aggressive invaders in history, replacing native grasses in wetlands and disrupting native ecosystem function. Wetlands are interesting study systems for invasive plants. […]

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