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Archive for December, 2019

Deep Sea: The Final Frontier

With the decade drawing to a close, it is a good time to look toward the future and start thinking about what the next decade holds for scientific discovery. Star Trek has popularized the idea of outer space as “the final frontier.” But what if it’s really the deep sea? Ashley MickensI am a senior […]

Turning Knowledge into Action: How the Town of Truro Adapted to Increasing Flood Risk Under Climate Change

Global sea level is projected to rise at a rate of 3.7mm/year throughout the first half of the next century, according to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPPC). As coastal communities around the world brace to meet this worrying projection, it’s become clear that many simply have no options […]

Think global, act local: how lake microbes respond to their environments

How do microbes in lake sediments respond to small and large scale influences, and what does it have to do with climate change? Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. I use models to study how small-scale physical processes at the air-sea interface – like waves – […]

Lights, Camera, and the Action-Packed World of Giant Viruses

A newly discovered giant virus might even be capable of altering its hosts ability to derive energy. A virus that infects a small eukaryotic predator has the largest viral genome found in oceans to date and has several novel genes that aid in its infection of these eukaryotic organisms. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in […]

A floating island: is this where we’re moving to next?

Are floating islands in our future? As many of may know, the sea level is rising and will eventually intrude on the space we have on land. In addition, if the population continues to increase, we may need to look elsewhere to live and grow food. The Horizon 2020 project is an initiative sponsored by […]

East African Lake Fosters a Melting Pot for Cichlid Evolution

Darwin’s famed finches weave a tale of evolution in isolation. Joana Meier and her research team now find that evolution, specifically adaptive radiation, may not actually require such complete isolation to stimulate the creation of new species. Rishya NarayananRishya is a multimedia science communicator with an MS in Media Advocacy from Northeastern University, specializing in […]

Christmas Tree….. Worms?

‘Tis the season for all things bright, colorful and decorative, and that makes me think of Christmas Tree Worms! Doesn’t everyone want Polychaetes for Hannukah? Just me? Maybe I can convince you.

Icebergs Fertilize Phytoplankton Growth

Icebergs contain iron, the limiting nutrient for phytoplankton in the polar regions. Icebergs, therefore, have the potential to stimulate biological productivity and carbon uptake. However, this will depend on the iceberg iron content, which is not well known. Therefore, a recent study sought to quantify the variability in iceberg iron content and subsequent carbon uptake. […]

You are what you eat: Microplastics travel from food to the brain

Oceans are full of microplastics. These tiny plastic particles end up in the stomach of marine animals. Now, scientists have discovered that microplastics can travel from the stomach of velvet swimming crabs to other organs – including the brain. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the […]

Ensuring that coral reefs sound like home

What does a coral reef sound like? The answer is more important than you might think. By playing the sounds of a healthy reef over a loudspeaker, scientists were able to attract a variety of baby fish to settle on a degraded reef, results which show how acoustic interventions are a tool that can be […]

Farmed Kelp to the Rescue? Not So Fast, Say Researchers

Kelp farming is on the rise across Europe and North America, and all the headlines say that’s a good thing for fighting climate change. But scientists say we need to make sure kelp farms don’t spawn even more environmental problems.    Grebe, Gretchen S., Carrie J. Byron, Adam St. Gelais, Dawn M. Kotowicz, and Tollef […]

Barnacles as a Forensic Tool

Barnacles are among the first organisms to colonize hard marine substrates. This means they quickly settle on rocks, ships, or even human remains! Find out how these small crustaceans help forensic investigators solve crimes. Constance SartorConstance is a graduate student at the University of Guam studying coral genetics. She also paints murals integrating art and […]

Larval fish foraging grounds inundated by plastic pollution

If the adage “you are what you eat” holds true, we may be in some big trouble. A recent study found that pieces of plastics are becoming concentrated in areas where larval fish hunt for food, which could be a big problem for fish and humans alike. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the […]

Sea-sick – Examining ocean diseases through literature

From coral bleaching to sea star wasting disease, stories of an unhealthy ocean have been all over the news. But are the animals in the sea actually sicker than before? Without long-running data sets tracking disease over time, it can be hard to see if diseases are growing more prevalent. In spite of this, Dr. […]

Welcome to the world, little ones!!

Article First record of recurring reproduction of captive tawny nurse sharks Nebrius ferrugineus. 2019. The fisheries Society of the British Isles. Lewis N. Cocks, Jonathan K.L. Mee, Alex P. Shepherd   Sharks have been kept in public aquariums since the 1860s. Many different species of sharks can be found in aquariums around the world, but […]

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