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Archive for February, 2020

Deep Breathing Underwater

The Labrador Sea is one of the lungs of the ocean. A new study finds that it is taking an even deeper breath than expected—making it more vulnerable to climate change than thought. Emily ChuaI am a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University where I am developing an underwater instrument to study the coastal ocean.  I […]

Key fisheries move North to Canada, but is Canada ready to adapt to a warmer ocean?

The American Lobster, Homarus americanus (by Bart Braun) Communities Shaped by the Ocean Climate change is expected to affect the behaviours, geographic ranges, and ecological processes of marine species around the world. In the Northwest Atlantic, scientists are particularly concerned about northward range shifts in resource species and potential declines in valuable shellfish fisheries that […]

Coccoliths and Carbon

As the ocean warms and acidification increases, a certain phytoplankton may be more at risk than others. The authors of this paper explore how changes in the Southern Ocean could prevent coccoliths from sequestering carbon and disrupt the marine carbon cycle. Ashley MickensI am a senior Environmental Earth Science and Sustainability major at Miami University […]

A story of success for the Cayman Island’s Nassau Grouper

Nassau Grouper are a historically overfished population in the Caribbean, but after new regulations were implemented in 2003, has the fishery recovered? Waterhouse et al. (2020) sought to answer this question using 15 years of monitoring efforts from the Cayman Islands. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode […]

Eating invasive species and the future of sustainable fisheries

Invasive species are a global phenomenon, and have been since modern human society became a global phenomenon. Many of them were brought purposefully as a food source to uncertain new destinations. But can we (and should we) eat our way out of the problem we ate our way into?

Athletic Atlantic salmon grow more brain cells than couch potato Atlantic salmon

Exercise is good for growing muscles – and, as it turns out, cells in the salmon brain. After three weeks of swimming against a strong current, young Atlantic salmon had more cells born in their brains. What does this mean for salmon? Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study […]

A round of underwater applause: Scientists record gray seals clapping underwater

How do you get someone else’s attention underwater? It turns out some seals may clap their flippers together the same way humans clap their hands. Marine animals make incredible sounds underwater, from the songs of humpback whales to the pops of snapping shrimp and the grunts of fish, and now we may hear the sounds […]

Blue Coral with a Not-So-Blue Future

Before this genetics study, we only knew of one extant octocoral species producing a massive skeleton. Not only does Iguchi’s study reveal speciation in blue coral, but it also suggests potential thermal resilience. Constance SartorConstance is a graduate student at the University of Guam studying coral genetics. She also paints murals integrating art and science […]

To fish or not to fish: Exploring China’s seafood production strategies

China is the world’s largest producer of seafood and uses many different production methods to keep this reputation. These methods differ in their environmental effects. This study surveys the outcomes of China’s marine seafood production strategies and discusses ways China plans to reduce their environmental footprint from fishing.  Diana FontaineI am a second year PhD […]

Could a novel disease help curb the lionfish invasion?

Since the first sighting in the 1980s, lionfish have rapidly invaded the waters of the Western Atlantic, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. With no natural predators, diseases, or parasites to control the growing population, the adaptable fish has easily expanded its range. However, a newly reported disease may finally be knocking down lionfish […]

Lionfish, Counting, and Errors, Oh My: Challenges in Measuring Biomass of an Invasive Nuisance 

Invasive lionfish in the Caribbean have been called “ravenous,” “destructive,” and “a living, breathing, devastating oil spill.” The hungry predators also grow differently between similar spots in the Caribbean, which a recent study argues makes the biomass of local lionfish populations hard to estimate accurately. Fine-tuning calculations will help scientists pinpoint how many of the […]

Protections with a bite: Are toothed whales sheltered by South African Marine Protected Areas?

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are often put into place to protect biodiversity and essential fish stocks, but toothed whales are rarely considered when deciding where to put an MPA. As South Africa looks to expand its protected areas, Jean Purdon and her colleagues set out to learn where the toothed whales are living off the […]

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