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Archive for March, 2020

A Seasonal “Freeze” on Arctic Methane Release

According to new research from the Arctic University of Norway, current greenhouse gas budgets overestimate the amount of methane released from the Arctic Ocean to the atmosphere. Read on to find out why that’s the case, and why this news is not entirely good. Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in Earth System Science at Stanford […]

Sinking Alligator Carcasses into the Deep Ocean to See What Eats Them

  The Deep Unknown The deep ocean is an alien world. Life here must contend with crushing pressures, near-freezing temperatures, and a complete absence of light. At more than a thousand feet deep, it’s also the least explored and least understood ecosystem on Earth. That’s a problem, because the deep makes up about 95% of […]

City Marine Parks: The Water Parks of the Future

Did you love going to the water park as a kid? The authors of this paper have come up with a new kind of water park to help improve life in coastal cities and make the most of “blue space.” Ashley MickensI am a senior Environmental Earth Science and Sustainability major at Miami University of […]

A transforming ecosystem: Chukchi and Bering Sea

Article: Huntington, H.P., Danielson, S.L., Wiese, F.K. et al. Evidence suggests potential transformation of the Pacific Arctic ecosystem is underway. Nat. Clim. Chang. (2020). Even though we constantly hear about climate change, we still do not understand how exactly and to what extent it affects our ecosystems. That is because ecosystems do not respond in […]

Envisioning a better world with climate impact modeling

After October 2018, the global perspective on climate change started to shift. We dive into climate impact models, and how they could help us plan for a future in which climate change impacts every aspect of our lives. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. I use […]

Octopuses can learn from an iPad too

As many universities are moving this semester’s coursework online, some may be wondering if learning from a screen is really that efficient. It turns out that it works pretty well – at least for octopuses. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water […]

Jellyfish: Future Scientists of the Sea

Is there a way to increase measurements across oceans using a hybrid of robotics and biology? In a recent study, scientists sought to answer this question using jellyfish and an engineered small ‘controller device’. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). […]

Phytoplankton: Small cells with a big impact

Tiny organisms called phytoplankton fuel the base of the marine food web. Did you know that every other breath of oxygen you take comes from the ocean? Read on to learn more about measuring phytoplankton production rates… Diana FontaineI am a second year PhD student in the Rynearson Lab studying Biological Oceanography at the Graduate […]

How could putting 3-D glasses on cuttlefish change the way we think about vision?

3-D glasses-wearing cuttlefish can show us more than just the latest fashion trends. They can also teach us about evolution and may even help us develop new algorithms for machine learning! Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island where I studied the sensory biology of deep-sea fishes. I am now […]

Prey variety is key to coexistence of octopuses and sea stars

At family gatherings, relatives often compete for that last bite of turkey or crescent roll. How do predators living in the same habitat get the resources they need? Do they compete for the same resources, or do they use resources in different ways? Read on to find out how Storero and colleagues investigated predator diets […]

Catch prey while the sun shines – Herring grow bigger when they can see their food

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a sea creature in possession of a home in higher latitudes (further from the equator), must (on average) possess more size than its mid latitude neighbors. But why should high latitude fish be in possession of such a good fortune? Kristin HuizengaI am a PhD student studying Biological […]

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