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biodiversity

This tag is associated with 8 posts

Oil and Gas Seeps: Microbial Elevators through Ocean Sediments

Many microorganisms live in ocean sediments – both at the seafloor, as well as in the subsurface hundreds to thousands of meters below. But how do these separate microbial populations interact, and what are the consequences? Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in Earth System Science at Stanford University, and I study how microbes in deep […]

Increasing Warming causes Ecosystem Change along the Northeastern Shelf

Are the tropics coming to the Northeast coast of the US? Freidland and his team seem to think so. A recent study shows how the Northeastern shelf region may experience tropicalization in the near future. Ashley MickensI am a senior Environmental Earth Science and Sustainability major at Miami University of Ohio. While my undergraduate research […]

If the benthos could talk: the value of long-term biodiversity monitoring

The tiny critters that burrow, swim, and graze in the benthic (bottom) habitats of marine ecosystems are often monitored over long time periods so that researchers can measure changes in biodiversity over time. Read on to find out how researchers used long-term benthic data from Narragansett Bay to link human activities with changes in biodiversity. […]

Antarctica’s growing green space

As the planet warms, Antarctic land ice is retreating rapidly in some regions, and along with this, small pockets of ice-free habitat are growing and connecting. A team of scientists predicted how much these ice-free regions will expand by the end of the century and what this means for Antarctica’s unique ecosystems. Veronica TamsittI’m a […]

How Much Wood Can A Wood Boring Clam Bore?

How much wood could a wood boring clam bore if a wood boring clam was given a lot of different options of wood to bore? Not as catchy as the original, but check this article out to learn about how the type of wood that falls to the deep ocean influences the community of animals […]

Rip Rap Sill: The Best of Both Worlds

The hybrid shoreline stabilization method called rip rap sill combines rock structures with native vegetation. This study found that fish biodiversity and abundance in rip rap sills was more similar to a native marsh than a built rip rap. Kari St.LaurentI received a Ph.D. in oceanography in 2014 from the Graduate School of Oceanography (URI) […]

Deep Blue Reads: The Sixth Extinction, by Elizabeth Kolbert

As a novelist writing about oceanography, I spend a decent amount of time parsing scientific studies. Over the past several years my vocabulary has expanded to include terms like band saturation, turbidity currents, and foraminifera—phrases and words that had not existed in my wildest dreams when I first started writing. I’ve relied on studies and […]

Determining marine bird distribution in Glacier Bay, Alaska using fine spatial-scale hydrographic modeling

Researchers in Glacier Bay surveyed fifteen species of marine birds and linked the observations to instantaneous measurements of current speed and water surface elevation to determine how fine-scale tidal features influence bird distribution. Samantha DeCuolloSamantha works as a laboratory technician in the Menden-Deuer laboratory at the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). She recently defended her […]

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