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coastal management

This tag is associated with 6 posts

Fig leaf or laurel wreath – When does “green” development help or hurt the ocean?

Making new coastal development more environmentally friendly seems like a win-win, but how much is helpful and how much is just for show? Kristin HuizengaI am a PhD student studying Biological Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. My interests are in food webs, ecology, and the interaction of humans and the […]

Effects may vary

For the past several decades, satellite data has indicated that our ocean’s height is on the rise. But little effort has gone to looking at this trend, in detail, at the local level. Dr. Benjamin Hamlington argues that such local changes are highly variable and have consequences for people planning for future coastal management. Eric […]

Beyond word of mouth: How local knowledge can fill fisheries data gaps

How can we accurately assess the extent of population declines in marine organisms? Read on to find out how local and traditional knowledge can inform future fisheries management by recounting past experiences. Katherine BarrettKate is a 4th year PhD candidate in the Biological Sciences Department at the University of Notre Dame, and holds a Masters […]

Oh Where, Oh Where Should This Oyster Reef Go?

Where indeed? Oyster reef restoration and use for shoreline protection requires some planning to maximize effectiveness. Find out more in today’s oceanbites! Rebecca FlynnI am a graduate of the University of Notre Dame (B.S.) and the University of Rhode Island (M.S.). I now work in southwest Florida, contributing to the management of an estuary. I […]

Taiwan creates “Facebook” for sea turtles!

Photo ID databases have been used to estimate population sizes for zebras, cheetahs, whales, sharks dolphins, turtles and more. This tool has now spread to a new area. Introducing the first animal photo ID database in Taiwan for green sea turtles! Megan ChenI graduated with a Masters of Coastal & Marine Management from the University […]

The Ghastly Impacts of Ghost Fishing Gear

Derelict fishing traps, or DFTs, are abandoned traps that may still be actively capturing marine organisms, in a phenomenon known as “ghost fishing.” In this study, a group of scientists put together a qualitative assessment on the ecological and economic impacts these traps may be having on coastal ecosystems throughout the United States. Erin MarkhamErin […]

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