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coral bleaching

This tag is associated with 14 posts

Corals can’t take the heat

Coral reefs are incredibly important to humans and other species, but they are also vulnerable to the effects of climate change. As ocean temperatures rise and El Niño brings abnormally warm temperatures, corals are at greater risk from a threatening phenomenon called coral bleaching. Katherine BarrettKate received her Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from the University […]

Two by two includes corals too? Researchers call for a coral “Noah’s Ark”

In the Bible, the story of Noah’s Ark describes a storm so intense and so long that the earth is covered in water, killing all except those protected in a massive boat. Today, coral scientists are proposing their own “Noah’s Ark,” but this time the relentless storm is climate change. Kristin HuizengaI am a PhD […]

Artificial Upwelling Saves Corals from Bleaching

Coral reefs are under threat due to a warming climate. Learn about a technologically-savvy new way to counteract the effects of these warmer temperatures: Artificial Upwelling systems. Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in Earth System Science at Stanford University, and I study how microbes in deep ocean sediments produce and consume greenhouse gases. I’m a […]

Can Corals Recover from the Effects of Climate Change?

With climate change becoming a more pressing issue, the world’s coral reefs are suffering heavy consequences. Corals are increasingly becoming bleached, which can lead to reef death. But are there ways for corals to recover from bleaching? Francesca GiammonaI am a PhD candidate at Wake Forest University, and I received a B.S. in Biology from […]

In an Uncertain Future, How Might Corals Survive?

Scleractinian corals form the framework for reef ecosystems but are increasingly threatened. By looking at the coral fossil record, scientists are beginning to understand how corals have survived in the past, and what will happen to them in the future. Elena GadoutsisI have always been happiest in nature – exploring forests, traveling to the ocean, […]

Renewed hope for reef-building corals to combat climate change.

If you have ever had a chance to snorkel in a reef, you would agree that it is an unforgettable experience. Its special mainly because of the colorful corals and the diverse life forms they support. But corals around the world are being hit hard from effects of warming ocean temperatures and ocean acidification. Corals […]

Climate-driven events leave an imprint on corals in the Great Barrier Reef

In this re-post, we discuss the ecological memory of corals from bleaching events that occurred back-to-back in 2016 and 2017. With this pattern repeating itself in 2020, has mass bleaching become a near-annual event? Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model […]

Sea-sick – Examining ocean diseases through literature

From coral bleaching to sea star wasting disease, stories of an unhealthy ocean have been all over the news. But are the animals in the sea actually sicker than before? Without long-running data sets tracking disease over time, it can be hard to see if diseases are growing more prevalent. In spite of this, Dr. […]

The Coral Dilemma: Is Hybridization the Key?

Coral: a mineral, plant, and animal all in one (oh my!) Unfortunately, coral is in danger- and the many reefs which support a wide variety of organisms (including humans) are rapidly dying. Does interspecific hybridization hold the key to our coral dilemma? Rishya NarayananRishya is a multimedia science communicator with an MS in Media Advocacy from […]

Stressed-out microbes in an acidifying ocean

The ocean is acidifying in response to carbon dioxide emissions, but we are just beginning to learn how this effects the ocean’s most abundant lifeforms – microbes. Michael GrawI’m a 5th year PhD student at Oregon State University researching the microbial ecology of marine sediments – why do we find microbes where they are in […]

I’m Gonna Soak Up the Sun: Sunscreen’s Impact on Coral Communities

Sunscreen prevents skin cancer but may also be linked to coral bleaching and harm to coral larvae. Read more to find out what scientists found in corals off the coast of Hong Kong when they sampled for common sunscreen UV protection chemicals. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography at […]

Hard Coral or Macroalgae? Coral Reefs May Have Another Option

Most of the time coral reef communities are discussed, it seems the focus is whether they’re dominated by hard coral or algae. It turns out there may be other possible outcomes for reefs in the future. Find out more in today’s oceanbites! Rebecca FlynnI am a graduate of the University of Notre Dame (B.S.) and […]

Coral Microbiome Health: There’s no probiotic yogurt for that

Coral reefs are essential to the overall health of the planet. Comprised of tiny, individual animals, these massive ecosystems contain as much biological activity as that of human crop production. By studying the microscopic organisms living within these corals, scientists can predict when a reef may be under threat from serious diseases before it is […]

A Coral Never Forgets

A good memory may help corals cope with bleaching events. Gordon OberPostdoctoral Researcher, Claremont McKenna College I am currently a postdoc at Keck Sciences, Claremont McKenna College. I work with Dr. Sarah Gilman, measuring and modeling energy budgets in intertidal species. I am a climate scientist and marine community ecologist and my PhD (University of […]

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