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fisheries

This tag is associated with 31 posts
whale shark

Watch out guys, pregnant whale sharks are on the loose!

Whale sharks have become an increasingly popular tourist attraction, but much of their life history remains largely unknown. This study sets off to observe whale sharks around Darwin Island to help understand more about their habitat use, population size, and seasonal appearances. And what they find is a whole lot of pregnant whale sharks.

Trawling cartoon, courtesy of NOAA

Bottom trawling changes bodies: the new seafloor diet

Seafloor trawling inevitably captures more than the species it is targeting. This means that when the remaining fishes line up at the buffet table, the options they have to choose from may be different than what they like to eat. In this article, Johnson et al., investigate whether two fish species in the Irish Sea are going hungry under different trawling conditions.

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The Language of Fishes

Coral reefs are composed of hundreds of different species, who all use different acoustics to communicate, just like we use different languages around the world to communicate. Researchers set out to better understand and record the language of fishes in hopes of building a species-specific soundscape of the coral reef community.

Smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis) is a common shark species along the US eastern seaboard, long considered a “trash fish” because of its high abundance and low commercial value (Source: Wikipedia.org)

Cartilaginous Conundrum: Are Sharks and Skates Safe to Eat?

While smooth dogfish may not be on your list of favorite seafood, cartilaginous fish (mainly sharks and skates) may increasingly find their way onto your dinner plate due to the decline of more traditional fisheries. While increased demand for these species as a food item could help struggling seafood industries, recent proposals to use dogfish in federal food programs beg the question: Is it safe to eat shark?

arthur et al - traps as habitat

The Ghastly Impacts of Ghost Fishing Gear

Derelict fishing traps, or DFTs, are abandoned traps that may still be actively capturing marine organisms, in a phenomenon known as “ghost fishing.” In this study, a group of scientists put together a qualitative assessment on the ecological and economic impacts these traps may be having on coastal ecosystems throughout the United States.

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Beware! Shellfish are taking over the fishing industry

Overfishing has created a cascading effect in the marine food web. Once, large apex predators, such as cod, dominated the fishing industry, but now, shellfish have taken over and contribute to more than half the fisheries stock.

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How will climate change affect coastal fisheries production?

Forecasted impacts of climate changes on fisheries production in coastal ecosystems suggest modest changes on average with significant increases in primary production in high latitude systems and declines near the equator. Fisheries in developing nations are most at risk. However, declining productivity may be buffered by responsible management practices.

rainbow wrasse

It’s all about color for the rainbow wrasse

Male rainbow wrasses actively defend their territory and the amount of red light entering the water column has been found to have an effect on how aggressive these males will be towards intruding wrasses.

Fig 3: The sea bream ready for consumption.

You Are What Your Fish Eats: how an invasive seaweed is contributing to the decline in nutritional value of commercial fish

Invasive species are known to be harmful to native species, biodiversity, and ecosystem function. But recent research has shown that certain invasive species may be affecting the nutritional quality of your food!

Pins show the location of all fishing weirs. Weirs were found in all countries except Iraq. The scientists attribute this to low visibility of the Iraq coastline. The image was made using Google Earth.

Annual fishing weir catches may be under-reported to the U.N. by Persian Gulf Nations

Scientists from the University of British Columbia who are a part of the Sea Around Us Project use Google Earth to estimate fish catches in the Persian Gulf. Their findings show that the estimated catch is up to six times greater than official figures from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Fishing_Trawler.jpg

Cooked fish: Ocean warming and global fisheries

Global fisheries are expected to change as ocean temperatures warm. A recent study by Cheung et al. uses mean temperature of catch, a metric based on species’ average thermal preferences, to determine whether fisheries are changing to include more warm-water species.

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