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food web

This tag is associated with 10 posts

Catch prey while the sun shines – Herring grow bigger when they can see their food

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a sea creature in possession of a home in higher latitudes (further from the equator), must (on average) possess more size than its mid latitude neighbors. But why should high latitude fish be in possession of such a good fortune? Kristin HuizengaI am a PhD student studying Biological […]

Larval fish foraging grounds inundated by plastic pollution

If the adage “you are what you eat” holds true, we may be in some big trouble. A recent study found that pieces of plastics are becoming concentrated in areas where larval fish hunt for food, which could be a big problem for fish and humans alike. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the […]

Beyond cannibalism, can tide pools help explain the universe?

It turns out tide pools are a lot more complex than they seem – and often inhabited by cannibals. Can we glean answers to the universe by peering into them? John Steinbeck seemed to think so. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. I use models to […]

Appreciate seafood? Climate change isn’t your friend.

Seafood depends on healthy food webs that support fish populations…but food webs depend on environmental conditions! Read on to learn how changing environmental conditions due to climate change stand to change the base of the food web, with far-reaching consequences. Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate […]

Small but mighty: the importance of forage fish to larger marine creatures

Forage fish like menhaden or capelin are vital to the health of larger marine animals; read on to learn how researchers from the University of Manitoba looked into just how important forage fish are to a northwestern Atlantic food web! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate […]

Microplastics demystified: a review examining how these tiny plastics act in pollutant transfer

Paper: Lohmann, R. Microplastics Are Not Important for the Cycling and Bioaccumulation of Organic Pollutants in the Oceans—but Should Microplastics Be Considered POPs Themselves? 2017. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management 13, 460-465. DOI: 10.1002/ieam.1914 Not so fantastic plastic The development of plastic revolutionized daily life. We owe our convenient modern lifestyle to these polymers in […]

Clamate Change: How clams may be able to cope with a warming world

Global temperatures are increasing at a rate never before seen in Earth’s history. Although efforts to mitigate this are still very important, it is also important to study and understand what is going to happen to the plants and animals that live here. Evidence of climate change already surrounds us, and the more we know, […]

Deadly Dino’s

Copepods dominate the world’s oceans. They are important in the marine food web and help to regulate the global carbon cycle. Being abundant in the ocean is not always fun. Copepods attract attention from infectious parasites, especially from a certain species of dinoflagellate. What potential effects can this parasite have on copepods and what other […]

Picky Eaters: how the feeding preference of lobsters may be slowing the return of California kelp forests.

There is a well-documented link between increased sea urchin abundance and the overall decline of kelp forest ecosystems. Too many urchins create what are called urchin barrens, devoid of the habitat forming kelps and lacking overall community diversity. Controlling the sea urchin population is vital to kelp recovery and this can happen through natural predation. […]

Big Fish Eats Little Fish: Biomagnification of Natural Toxins

Naturally occurring poisons produced by some microorganisms can concentrate to dangerous levels in carnivorous fish, just like man-made pollutants do. In this study, researchers travelled to the Republic of Kiribati to investigate how ciguatoxins, responsible for ciguatera fish poisoning, are transferred between species in a complex reef ecosystem. Carrie McDonoughI am the founder of oceanbites, […]

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