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geology

This tag is associated with 21 posts

Can clays from northern Canada provide a 3,000-year temperature record of the Atlantic Ocean?

A sediment record from a lake in northern Canada is being used to reconstruct Atlantic Ocean temperatures at a resolution never achieved before. Shawn WangI am a PhD student studying climate physics and marine geology at MIT and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. I am interested in using geochemical methods and climate models to study periods […]

How cold did the ice age really get?

Scientists revisit the question of global temperatures during the last ice age. They tackle this with state of the art climate models and geochemistry to give a picture that’s more accurate than ever before. Shawn WangI am a PhD student studying climate physics and marine geology at MIT and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. I am […]

Skating on Thin Ice

Newly developed global climate models show us that Arctic Sea ice may be more unstable than we previously thought. The first ice-free summer in the Arctic may be just around the corner. Shawn WangI am a PhD student studying climate physics and marine geology at MIT and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. I am interested in […]

How much heat is stored in the oceans: Insights from ice cores

Reviewing: Shackleton, S., et al. “Global ocean heat content in the Last Interglacial.” Nature geoscience 13.1 (2020): 77-81. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-019-0498-0 Water is a super-sponge of heat On hot summer days, we often run to the beach or swimming pool to cool off and relax, but did you know that our planet also stays cool thanks to […]

International Ocean Discovery Program (Note; Photo originally taken by DSDP then given to Ocean Drilling Program to archive. International Ocean Discovery Program is the current archivist.)

Under the Sea(floor): Ocean Drilling and Scientific Discovery

Deep, dark, and mysterious, the ocean seafloor contains clues and records of past life and climates on earth. Understanding the subseafloor is critical to understanding our planet. But how do we reach these muds and rocks that lie beneath? Here we explore the history of subseafloor exploration, and find out about some of the technologies […]

Best of both worlds: stromatolites of the intertidal zone

Did you know that the earliest form of life on Earth can still be found today? Read more to find out how researchers studied ancient formations called stromatolites growing within the intertidal zone of Cape Elizabeth, South Africa, and how salinity and nutrients influence these rare structures. Katherine BarrettKate received her Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology […]

Red dead algae

Life on earth has been evolving for a long time – billions of years! The timing of when different kinds of life developed is controversial, but can tell us about the conditions of earth in the past. A group of scientists in Sweden looked at ancient fossils from India, and found what they describe as […]

Mountains vs. Climate, Recorded in Marine Sediment

Mountain ranges can actively evolve with Earth’s climate. A new study of the St. Elias Range in coastal Alaska demonstrates how dynamic and coupled our planet’s crust is to climate, and how we can investigate past erosion through marine sediments. Zoe GentesZoe has an M.S. in Oceanography and a B.S. in Geologic Oceanography from URI, […]

Climate Transgressions and Barrier Islands

Barrier Islands support local economies, residents, tourism, fragile environments, and sometimes valuable resources. Yet, they are extremely susceptible to storms and sea level change. A new study examines the past 12,000 years in sediments to try to understand how these coastal landforms may be affected in the future. Zoe GentesZoe has an M.S. in Oceanography […]

The Great Barrier Reef is worth $15 billion – $20 billion AUS a year: A quick lesson in ecosystem economics

When discussing the value of an ecosystem, tensions run high. Some people evaluate ecosystems with heavy emphasis on non-use values, like aesthetics and spiritual appreciation. Other people value ecosystems based on things like natural resource availability and the potential for direct monetary revenue. It is difficult to assess the relative importance (or value) of these […]

A volcano, a tropical cyclone, and a computer model walked into a room…

Like with bad jokes, timing is everything. The punch line doesn’t make sense if you don’t know the back story, just like when mixing active volcanoes, tropical cyclones, and new volcanic smog dispersion models. Sarah FullerWith academic backgrounds in oceanography, geology, and environmental education, Sarah has traveled to far reaches of the planet to learn […]

The oldest seawater chemically analyzed

Water water everywhere, water water always there, but how it’s changed you may not know, read this story and Spear et al. will tell you so. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a marine research scientist who has been lucky to have had many roles in my neophyte career, including […]

Need help counting bubbles? Now you can use sound!

Bubbles elicit scenes of childhood summers playing on the front stoop or backyard. On the other hand, put bubbles at the bottom of the ocean and you will find highly educated adults toiling with complicated mathematical equations and state-of-the-art technology. Sarah FullerWith academic backgrounds in oceanography, geology, and environmental education, Sarah has traveled to far […]

Oceanography in space! Using a satellite to profile an extraterrestrial lake

In 2013, a satellite orbiting Saturn passed by its largest moon, Titan. The satellite track offered a rare opportunity to collect depth-sounding data of an extraterrestrial lake. Lis HendersonI am studying for my doctoral degree at the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences. My research addresses fisheries and climate change in the […]

First evidence of deep explosive volcanic activity at the Marsili Seamount

The Marsili Seamount is the largest volcanic complex in the Mediterranean area and Europe. Previously thought to have last erupted between 100,000 and 1 million years ago, new evidence suggests the latest eruption was only 3 thousand years ago. Additionally, that eruption was explosive and deep (500-800 meters below sea level), resulting in several tephra […]

Reconstructing climate history from sediments in the Gulf of Taranto, Italy

What was the climate like in Southern Italy 10,000 years ago? This question and many more can be answered by collecting sediment from the seafloor. Understanding the types of sediment and where it all came from, and determining the age of deposition make it possible to reconstruct the history of regional climate. Brian CaccioppoliI am […]

If Popocatépetl volcano blows, prepare for a few nights stuck in the airport.

Plinian eruptions have a high degree of material fragmentation, generating high altitude ash plumes that can travel far from the vent site. The impacts of these types of eruptions include hazards such as human health concerns, roof collapses, disruption of terrestrial communications, and the jeopardization of air travel. Sarah FullerWith academic backgrounds in oceanography, geology, […]

Riding the Waves of Change: A Revised Beach Cycle for Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches

A seasonal cycle of sand volume for typical sand beaches has been described for decades. This cycle does not hold true for beaches of mixed sand and gravel compositions. The highlighted study revises the beach cycle based off of observations during a year of strong storms. Improving our understanding of how the beach responds and […]

From the beach to the abyss: A sand grain’s journey at La Réunion Island

The path a grain of sand takes from land to the deep sea is largely made possible by turbidity currents- dense currents of sediment and water traveling rapidly through the ocean. A recent study focused on La Réunion Island, a volcanic island in the Indian Ocean, highlights the importance of submarine canyons and turbidity currents […]

Passing gas makes islanders feel a burn: CO2 degassing, low pH and the similarities between an underwater Greek volcano and two Cameroon lakes

Roughly 360 years ago, on a September afternoon in the Aegean sea, the sky was blotted out as metals tarnished and inhabitants complained of terrible eye pain. By the time the skies cleared on one island, roughly 70 people had died of asphyxiation. Today, the picturesque vacation destination is covered with blue roofed, white stucco […]

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