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Mercury

This tag is associated with 15 posts

Human mercury pollution found at the deepest ocean

For many decades, humans have been putting mercury into the ocean, contaminating big fish like tuna and swordfish. But we haven’t fully realized how deep human-produced mercury could move down the ocean until now – and now scientist have found mercury pollution at the deepest parts of the ocean. Jiwoon ParkI am a PhD student […]

Mercurial fish: Climate change and temperature could change how much mercury you’re eating

Dr. Amina Schartup’s research focuses on many important issues to both marine and human health, including methylmercury concentration in fish. Read on to learn more about Dr. Schartup’s research. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). My research interests are focused […]

Genetically Modified Yeast Can Clean Up Wastewater

Humans have been polluting the ocean with heavy metals by burning fossil fuels, mining metals and discharging wastewater. But we may be able to clean up metals from the ocean in the near future with yeast. Jiwoon ParkI am a PhD student in chemical oceanography at University of Washington. I am studying how different forms […]

Ocean to Table Mercury: a Rising Risk

For fish eaters, mercury consumption is an ever-present worry but often pushed to the backs of our minds. But the risk of mercury poisoning is only increasing as human activity introduce more mercury into the ocean and atmosphere. In their recent paper, Lavoie and his colleagues estimate how much mercury is reaching our plates through […]

Heavy Metal Presence in Fish from Fresh and Coastal Waters of Ghana

Heavy metal: it’s not just an intense genre of rock music, but also an element high in density that can be incredibly toxic to humans at concentrated levels. While marine life faces many threats, an increasingly severe force has been the addition and accumulation of heavy metals in both coastal and freshwater environments. Francis Gbogbo […]

How warming weather will open the mercury bank in Alaska

Researchers in this study measured mercury in Alaska and calculated the mercury to organic carbon ratio. This ratio was used to estimate where the dominant mercury storage is in the Northern Hemisphere. Read more to find out what they discovered! Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University […]

Just breathe…OR NOT: Mercury from hydrothermal vents in bubbles and the air

Mercury is a toxic element that can accumulate in marine organisms, including fish we eat. But how does mercury into marine environments? Here we talk about the findings from Bagnato et al., who found lots of mercury coming from hydrothermal systems, and that it could transfer from the water to the air! Laura ZinkeI am […]

What can tuna tell us about mercury emissions?

North America’s mercury emissions have declined over the last two decades. Researchers have found a connection between the declining emissions and the mercury level in tuna. Read more to find out how they made this link and what it could mean for the future. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of […]

What’s in the Hair of a Polar Bear?

The accumulation of toxic methylmercury is a serious threat to wildlife all over the world – especially top predators in polar regions, like polar bears. Young polar bears are often the most vulnerable to detrimental effects of pollutants. To learn more about levels of mercury in polar bear cubs and their mothers, scientists measured total […]

Written in bone: what ancient Pacific Cod can tell us about sea level rise and mercury

Through biogeochemical analysis, researchers found that mercury levels in ancient Pacific Cod bones peaked at a time of deglaciation and sea level rise. Read more about the study, and what it may tell us about future climate change. Megan ChenI graduated with a Masters of Coastal & Marine Management from the University of Akureyri in […]

Cartilaginous Conundrum: Are Sharks and Skates Safe to Eat?

While smooth dogfish may not be on your list of favorite seafood, cartilaginous fish (mainly sharks and skates) may increasingly find their way onto your dinner plate due to the decline of more traditional fisheries. While increased demand for these species as a food item could help struggling seafood industries, recent proposals to use dogfish […]

Impostor! How mislabeled seafood affects the amount of mercury you ingest

Seafood mislabeling is a big problem for both consumers and fisheries management. Using genetic data and mercury concentrations, scientists figured out how frequently store-bought Chilean sea bass was swapped. Results indicate seafood substitutions can mean very different concentrations of mercury in your meal. Lis HendersonI am studying for my doctoral degree at the Stony Brook […]

The Hairy Truth: Using Grizzly Bear hair to study mercury levels

A large portion of the North American Grizzly Bear population call Western Canada home. The diet of these bears ranges from berries to mammals, and every year in the fall, coastal bears consume copious amount of Pacific salmon. This study investigates hair samples from Grizzly Bears and how they can be used to reflect dietary […]

Sea ice leads cause changes in mercury and ozone levels in the Arctic

In our changing climate, the opening and closing of sea-ice is occurring more frequently, resulting from thick perennial Arctic sea ice shifting into thin seasonal ice sheets. This physical phenomenon can not only affect the energy balance in the Arctic, but can also have some influence on its atmospheric chemistry involving components such as mercury […]

Is the Oil Sands Industry in Canada Linked to Mercury Levels in Birds?

The oil or “tar” sands in Alberta, Canada are the third largest known reserves of accessible oil in the world. They are located around 200 km upstream of the Peace-Athabasca Delta, which is considered a wetland of international significance. This Delta is an ecologically sensitive habitat that provides services for millions of birds, which led […]

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