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ocean warming

This tag is associated with 14 posts
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Take my breath away: Decline in oceanic oxygen levels fifty years in the making

Most marine organisms require dissolved oxygen to sustain their survival. So what is the current status of oceanic oxygen levels? Read on to learn about the oft under appreciated resource of our planet!

Fig. 4: Ringed seal pup. Author: Shawn Dahle, NOAA, Polar Ecosystems Program research cruise. Source: Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pusa_hispida_pup.jpg

Throwing Babies out with the Sea Ice: Ringed Seals Response to Ice Decline

As the Earth warms, sea ice declines. What happens to those animals who rely on the ice? Today’s oceanbites looks at one animal, the ringed seal, and how it may be affected by climate change!

Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) [Wikimedia]

Now we got bad blood: Oxygen binding is not affected by haemoglobin subtype in Atlantic cod

Why do northern and southern populations of Atlantic cod have different haemoglobin subtypes? A recent study upsets over 50 years of theory.

Satellite image of the Mertz Glacier Tongue just after breaking off from the glacier. Image from NASA Earth Observatory.

Antarctica’s bottom waters freshen up

A team of researchers went back to the same part of Antarctic after a decade to see how the deep ocean had changed, and were surprised to find the deep ocean was fresher than they expected.

Soft coral dominated reef. Author: Matt Kieffer. Source: Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/mattkieffer/15439205306)

Hard Coral or Macroalgae? Coral Reefs May Have Another Option

Most of the time coral reef communities are discussed, it seems the focus is whether they’re dominated by hard coral or algae. It turns out there may be other possible outcomes for reefs in the future. Find out more in today’s oceanbites!

Figure 2: Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Credit: Wikicommons.

The Pacific Pacemaker: Using Models to Explain Warming Hiatus

While the Earth’s mean surface temperature is slowly increasing, there are occasional, temporary slowdowns in the overall trend. The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation, a strong, varying climate pattern, may be held accountable for the phenomenon.

Fig. 1. Polar Bear (climate change refugee). Source: Wikimedia Commons, Author Arturo de Frias Marques.

If You Must, Adjust? Polar Bears Leaving Sea Ice in the Arctic

Everyone knows that polar bears have become the poster children for species threatened by climate change. And it’s for good reason that they are. Polar bears rely on sea ice for access to prey, finding mates, and creating dens. The persistence of the species depends on the state of sea-ice and more generally a healthy marine ecosystem in the Arctic. Unfortunately, the volume and extent of sea ice have been decreasing by 28% and 14% per decade. Is there a way for polar bears to adapt to the changing sea ice coverage in this sensitive habitat?

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Ocean circulation keeping it cool in Antarctica

A group of scientists have delved deeper to solve the puzzle of why the ocean around Antarctica has been cooling, while the rest of the ocean is rapidly warming.

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Ocean robots record California’s latest hot year

Using underwater gliders, researchers explain what caused the extremely warm ocean along the coast of California in 2014-2015 and what this might mean for local ecosystems.

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Can the ocean take the heat?

Things heat up as scientists investigate deeper to find out how much heat the ocean can take.

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The Codfathers: Holding the Keys to Success in Warming Oceans

Atlantic cod stocks have struggled to recover from overfishing for decades. Warming oceans will make a cod recovery even more difficult as the cold water fish struggle to reproduce in warmer waters. A new study in the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology examines if fathers play an important role in generating offspring that are better adapted for warmer waters.

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Kelp: It’s whats for dinner (or where you live)

Kelp is a kind of large algae that supports diverse ecosystems. These kelp forests may start receding as a result of ocean warming. How the organisms that live in these forests respond to the warmer environment and damaged kelp may determine how quickly that happens.

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If it you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kelp forest!

Kelp is a kind of algae that supports diverse ecosystems in the nearshore ocean. As the climate and ocean warms, however, these kelp could begin to die off. How, when, and why the kelp die has important consequences for species diversity that will affect ecosystem and fisheries management.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Fishing_Trawler.jpg

Cooked fish: Ocean warming and global fisheries

Global fisheries are expected to change as ocean temperatures warm. A recent study by Cheung et al. uses mean temperature of catch, a metric based on species’ average thermal preferences, to determine whether fisheries are changing to include more warm-water species.

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