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Physical Oceanography

This tag is associated with 15 posts

Sea Ice Drives Global Circulation

A recent study uses observational data from the Antarctic to show that sea ice processes help drive the global current system called the overturning circulation. This result suggests that changes to sea ice extent in the Antarctic could impact large-scale circulation as well as the ocean’s uptake of heat and carbon dioxide. Channing PrendI’m a […]

The Declining Japanese Eel Population: Is Ocean Circulation to Blame?

Recent declines in Japanese eel populations have been attributed to overfishing, but that may not be the only factor at play. Chang et al. investigate whether recent changes in ocean circulation might help explain this alarming trend. Julia DohnerJulia is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. Her focus is […]

Uneven Ocean Warming as the Planet Shed its Ice

Our oceans underwent major changes when the planet transitioned from the Last Glacial Maximum to our current interglacial (or “between glaciations”) period. So what was going on in the ocean during this transformation? Julia DohnerJulia is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. Her focus is on biogeochemistry, which, as […]

Making waves in the Southern Ocean

Scientists from the Applied Physics Laboratory in Seattle tested a wave-powered ocean robot in the treacherous, turbulent waters of the Drake Passage for the first time in the name of science. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and […]

Current connections: how far away coastlines influence marine reserves

A research team used a state-of-the-art model to map how four remote Marine Protected Areas are connected to the surrounding oceans, and how human activities are impacting them from afar. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s […]

Best of both worlds: stromatolites of the intertidal zone

Did you know that the earliest form of life on Earth can still be found today? Read more to find out how researchers studied ancient formations called stromatolites growing within the intertidal zone of Cape Elizabeth, South Africa, and how salinity and nutrients influence these rare structures. Katherine BarrettKate is a 2nd year PhD student […]

Atlantic confirmed as accomplice in Arctic sea ice loss

A team of scientist gathered new evidence from the Arctic Ocean, revealing a new suspect responsible for rapidly melting Arctic sea ice. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s role in climate. For my research I sometimes […]

Is the Deep Ocean Warming Too?

It’s been shown that the surface of the South Pacific Ocean has been warming by absorbing excess heat from the atmosphere, but is this heat making it down to the deep ocean? Deep-ocean warming can lead to more rapid global warming in the future, but detecting it is tricky. Despite the challenges, a team of […]

Tide records could have underestimated global sea level rise

New analysis of 100 years of sea level measurements from tide gauges show that we might be underestimating the global rate of sea level rise. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s role in climate. For my […]

A salty ocean makes a happy home (planet)

The first things we learn about the ocean are that it’s big and salty. We know that its bigness is an important factor for earth’s climate; the authors of this paper demonstrate that its saltiness is too, and that this can affect whether other earth-like planets are truly habitable. caelCael was once told by a […]

12,000 feet under the sea, from space

A pair of scientists have figured out how to track deep ocean currents using gravity measurements from space. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s role in climate. For my research I sometimes spend months at sea […]

Arctic could become more biologically productive as ice melts

As Arctic sea-ice melts away, organisms will be exposed to more light and, potentially, more nutrients. Recent model work suggests that this combination will result in a more biologically active Arctic. But the net result might not be as positive as you think. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. […]

Oceanbites Mingles With ArcticMix (Part 3)

This is part 3 of 3 in a series on the recent ArcticMix expedition aimed at improving ocean models that describe faster-than-predicted Arctic warming. Oceanbites sat down with Dr. Jennifer MacKinnon, chief scientist for the mission, to discuss her experiences in the field and her life as a scientist. Virginia SchutteI just finished my graduate […]

Oceanbites Mingles With ArcticMix (Part 1)

This is part 1 of 3 interview posts on the ArcticMix voyage. Scientists share their experiences with life aboard a cutting-edge research vessel! Megan ChenI graduated with a Masters of Coastal & Marine Management from the University of Akureyri in Iceland, and am currently working at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in […]

Waiter, there’s a whale in my soup: investigating the South Pacific garbage patch

Plastic debris has been found in both the North Pacific and North Atlantic since the early 1970s. It accumulates in naturally forming gyres located in the subtropical zones of the world’s oceans, creating a “plastic soup.” Recent investigations have confirmed the presence of a similar garbage patch in the South Pacific. Zoe RugeI have a […]

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