//archives

Southern Ocean

This tag is associated with 23 posts

Ocean Acidification Reduces Habitat for Antarctic Organisms

A new study uses a climate model to predict that ocean acidification will reduce the viable habitat for many marine organisms in the Antarctic over the next century. This is because more acidic seawater dissolves the chemical compounds that the organisms need to form their shells. Channing PrendI’m a physical oceanography PhD student at Scripps […]

A change in ocean circulation makes for long glacial periods through the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

Isotope records from the Southern Ocean imply that prolonged epochs of time between glacial and interglacial periods through the Mid-Pleistocene Transition were caused by a reduction in deep waters mixing with the surface and the positive feedback it created with the salinity gradient. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a […]

Why Are Some Icebergs Green?

If someone asked you to imagine an iceberg, chances are you’d picture something big and white. However icebergs actually come in a range of colors from white, to blue, and even green. A recent study looks into what gives certain icebergs a unique green coloration. They find that iron oxide minerals are responsible, which could […]

Antarctic Ice Key to the Carbon Cycle

A recent study suggests that nutrients from glacial melt and icebergs supports a significant portion of the biological production in the Antarctic. This in turn has implications for the global carbon cycle, since photosynthesis by microorganisms is one of the ways the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Channing PrendI’m a physical oceanography PhD […]

Pacific flushing leads to carbon dioxide surges

While it might seem silly to care about what the ocean was doing 10,000 years ago, these old oceans impacted how Earth’s climate is today! Read more here to find out about what might have caused the Pacific Ocean to ‘burp’ the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, which helped end the ice age! […]

Antarctic Eddies Suck Carbon from the Atmosphere

A recent study from researchers at the University of Tasmania investigates the relationship between ocean eddies and phytoplankton growth in the Southern Ocean using satellite data. The results can help us understand and predict how the ocean’s ability to regulate climate might change in the future. Channing PrendI’m a physical oceanography PhD student at Scripps […]

Sea Ice Modifies Biological Processes

A recent study investigates the relationship between sea ice variability and phytoplankton growth in climate models. Phytoplankton are responsible for most of the transfer of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to the ocean, therefore this work can help us understand and predict how the ocean’s ability to regulate climate might change in the future.     Channing […]

Marine Snow & Muddy Megacoring on the Southern Ocean

Check out this guest post by Marlo Garnsworthy to read about an exciting voyage to the Southern Ocean…Marlo took part in a several week research cruise to learn about climate change using sediment samples from the region…read on to learn about the experience and see Marlo’s great pictures! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD […]

Changing winds drive more ocean heat capture

A team of scientists look to the Southern Ocean to show where and why the ocean has been storing extra heat. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s role in climate. For my research I sometimes spend […]

Mixing it up in the Southern Ocean

A team of scientists used underwater ocean gliders to measure ocean turbulence and mixing along the Antarctic continental slope and their results are changing our understanding of the 3-dimensional circulation of the Southern Ocean. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern […]

Making waves in the Southern Ocean

Scientists from the Applied Physics Laboratory in Seattle tested a wave-powered ocean robot in the treacherous, turbulent waters of the Drake Passage for the first time in the name of science. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and […]

Return from the deep: three-dimensional pathways of upwelling in the Southern Ocean

A group of scientists mapped the pathways of deep water to the sea surface in three-dimensions for the first time, finding that most upwelling happens at key spots of swirling eddies near undersea ridges and mountains. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on […]

Metal fingerprints enhance recycling

The bioaccumulation of bioactive metals in top predators plays a key role in the recycling of nutrients in HNLC zones of the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, the concentration of bioactive metals can be used as a ‘fingerprint’ to identify the appropriate trophic level of a species. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, […]

Using seabirds to study squid

How do scientists track fast swimming squid in the remote and vast open waters of the Southern Ocean? Probably not in any way you’d expect. They use squid predators, specifically a seabird—the wandering albatross—to find the squid for them. These albatrosses are outfitted with some very cool technology to bring the researchers information on their […]

Oceans absorb more carbon with weaker ocean circulation

A team of researchers investigate why the ocean has been absorbing more carbon from the atmosphere in recent decades, and find ocean circulation could be responsible. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s role in climate. For […]

Beyond Florida-bound: Birds tweak their winter travel plans in response to climate change

Seabirds are switching up their annual winter travels in response to climate change…read on to discover how researchers used museum displays, isotopes, and really expensive GPS tags to piece together this seabird story. Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann Lab. […]

Positive real estate outlook for Antarctic krill

An Australian research team predict future sea-ice habitats for Antarctic krill larvae, and are surprised to find more suitable ice habitats in the future, despite shrinking sea-ice cover. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s role in […]

Why the Southern Ocean is getting less salty

The Southern Ocean has been getting less salty for decades, and scientists have finally proved that sea-ice is responsible for the extra fresh water in the ocean. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s role in climate. […]

Ocean circulation keeping it cool in Antarctica

A group of scientists have delved deeper to solve the puzzle of why the ocean around Antarctica has been cooling, while the rest of the ocean is rapidly warming. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s role […]

Why iron fertilization hasn’t worked

Fertilizing the ocean with iron to help algae store more carbon in the deep sea was once heralded as a solution for global warming. But decades of research has suggested it doesn’t work as advertised. What went wrong? Read on to find out! Michael PhilbenI recently completed a PhD in Marine Science at the University […]

Subscribe to oceanbites

@oceanbites on Twitter