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Southern Ocean

This tag is associated with 9 posts
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Oceans absorb more carbon with weaker ocean circulation

A team of researchers investigate why the ocean has been absorbing more carbon from the atmosphere in recent decades, and find ocean circulation could be responsible.

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Beyond Florida-bound: Birds tweak their winter travel plans in response to climate change

Seabirds are switching up their annual winter travels in response to climate change…read on to discover how researchers used museum displays, isotopes, and really expensive GPS tags to piece together this seabird story.

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Positive real estate outlook for Antarctic krill

An Australian research team predict future sea-ice habitats for Antarctic krill larvae, and are surprised to find more suitable ice habitats in the future, despite shrinking sea-ice cover.

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Why the Southern Ocean is getting less salty

The Southern Ocean has been getting less salty for decades, and scientists have finally proved that sea-ice is responsible for the extra fresh water in the ocean.

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Ocean circulation keeping it cool in Antarctica

A group of scientists have delved deeper to solve the puzzle of why the ocean around Antarctica has been cooling, while the rest of the ocean is rapidly warming.

Figure 1: algae blooms off the coast of England (Creative Commons)

Why iron fertilization hasn’t worked

Fertilizing the ocean with iron to help algae store more carbon in the deep sea was once heralded as a solution for global warming. But decades of research has suggested it doesn’t work as advertised. What went wrong? Read on to find out!

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12,000 feet under the sea, from space

A pair of scientists have figured out how to track deep ocean currents using gravity measurements from space.

The ship’s marine technician Mike and I deploying the first SOCCOM float in rough conditions in the Southern Ocean.

Sailing the Southern Ocean for science

Hear about my adventures living on an icebreaker on the Southern Ocean, deploying ocean robots to understand the chemistry and biology of the Southern Ocean.

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Volcanic ash, fertilizer for the ocean?

Volcanic ash may be an important source of the valuable micronutrients iron and manganese to phytoplankton populations in areas with low chlorophyll, such as the Southern Ocean.

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