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whales

This tag is associated with 6 posts

Minke Boings: A 50-year mystery and the science of listening in the ocean

The study of whale and dolphin communication has evolved from recordings of mysterious sounds, like the minke “boing,” which were recorded by sonar and antisubmarine warfare researchers. Now we can use sound to study elusive marine creatures, like the minke whale. Julia ZehI am a first-year PhD student at Syracuse University studying acoustic communication in […]

Threats to Cetaceans: There’s More than Meets the Eye

Researchers spent seven years specifically studying deceased, stranded cetaceans along the coastline of the Canary Islands in Spain to figure out what most likely caused their deaths. They found that while human activity accounted for a large portion, something else was responsible for a much larger percentage of cetacean death. Rishya NarayananRishya is pursuing an […]

Can you hear me now? Investigating sound across the Atlantic Ocean

The ocean is full of sounds, ranging from marine mammal conversations to man-made noises used to investigate the seafloor.  Ocean noise pollution makes it hard for marine mammals to communicate with each other. Read more to learn how scientists measure sound in the Atlantic Ocean. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School […]

a Whale’s tale

Age estimations of marine mammals are traditionally made with a single tooth. A group of scientists from Australia think they can improve the traditionally method by adding more teeth into the equation. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a marine research scientist who has been lucky to have had many […]

Elastic nerves make rorqual whales the Mister Fantastic of the ocean

A team of researchers have discovered extremely elastic nerves in the mouth and tongue of rorqual whales. This is highly unusual considering nerves in nearly all other animals are quite rigid and sensitive to damage by overextension. Irvin HuangA recent convert to oceanography, I’m studying under Dr. Anne McElroy at Stony Brook University’s School of […]

Baleen whales have a bone to pick with noise pollution

CT scans of the skull of a beached whale has helped a pair of researchers figure out how baleen whales hear. Through computer modeling, they found that baleen whales, in addition to using soft tissue in their head like antennas, also use the bones in their skull to pick up sounds from their environment. Irvin […]

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