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cael

cael has written 8 posts for oceanbites
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Can bumps in the seafloor explain glacial-interglacial cycles?

The best scientific theories bring lots of things together in unexpected ways. This one has ice ages, seafloor volcanoes, sea level changes, wobbles in the earth’s rotation, and much more!

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A salty ocean makes a happy home (planet)

The first things we learn about the ocean are that it’s big and salty. We know that its bigness is an important factor for earth’s climate; the authors of this paper demonstrate that its saltiness is too, and that this can affect whether other earth-like planets are truly habitable.

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Unbelizeable, part II

A fieldwork faerie tale about an art/island paradise/conservation opportunity gone right

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Unbelizeable, part I

A fieldwork faerie tale about an art/island paradise/conservation opportunity gone right

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The ocean + a blind turtle + some driftwood = lucky to be human

Today we’ll take a detour from our usual format to do a quick ‘back-of-the-envelope’ calculation about Buddhism and why being human is special.

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How thick is polar ice?

Based on a simple theory, the authors of this study are able to make a prediction about the distribution of sea ice thickness that works remarkably well, and provides a novel approach to estimating how much ice the polar ice caps contain.

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Comparing all the ecosystems ever reveals cool patterns about their structure

Who’d guess that if you took the data from >2000 ecosystem studies and smashed them all together there’d be some interesting information in there somewhere? It turns out general relationships between individuals’ size and metabolism are reflected on the ecosystem level as well, across a huge span of marine and terrestrial life.

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Ocean eddies suck carbon out of the atmosphere, thanks to plankton

When phytoplankton sink into the deep ocean, they take carbon with them, storing CO2 away from the atmosphere. This new study suggests that ocean eddies may play an important role in getting this tiny organisms to sink!

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