//archives

Book Review

This category contains 162 posts

Southern Ocean diatoms: small, yet mighty!

Tiny organisms called phytoplankton fuel the marine food web. How have they adapted to live in the Southern Ocean where ice cover limits light exposure, water temperatures are frigid, and iron, an important resource for cellular function, is extremely limited? Read on to learn more about these small, but mighty organisms. Diana FontaineI am a […]

Where are the Zooplankton?

Ever wonder how researchers combine observations of organisms in the water to what we can see from satellites? Read on for a summary of newly published research by Dr. Jean-Hoel and co-authors. Melanie FeenI am a first year graduate student at the Graduate School of Oceanography at University of Rhode Island. I use robots and […]

Coral Cultures- A Test of Strength

What corals can best tolerate the effects of climate change? Check out this review of a recent paper by Yuan et al. to find out! Melanie FeenI am a first year graduate student at the Graduate School of Oceanography at University of Rhode Island. I use robots and satellites to research the biological carbon pump, […]

Hijackers within the Sea: Catching a ride across an ocean

Did you know that organisms attached to marine debris can unintentionally cross ocean basins? Read more to learn how the tsunami of 2011 brought Japanese marine organisms to the coast of North America and what this means for the environment. Diana FontaineI am a first year PhD student in the Rynearson Lab studying Biological Oceanography […]

Tips from a workshop on Negotiating

Negotiating is a valuable skillset that many scientists are never formally trained in. This post highlights some of the take away messages from a Strategic Persuasion and Negotiating workshop I attended last week (November 13, 2018). Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a marine research scientist who has been lucky […]

Productivity Comes In Waves

How do waves in the ocean affect phytoplankton? Check out this post to learn more! Melanie FeenI am a first year graduate student at the Graduate School of Oceanography at University of Rhode Island. I use robots and satellites to research the biological carbon pump, which is a series of processes that transfer carbon dioxide […]

Turtles of the North – Canadian Fishermen Help Scientists Study the Cryptic Leatherback

  For most people, sea turtles evoke visions of white sand beaches, crystal clear waters, and boozy fruity drinks, the embodiment of a tropical vacation. They don’t usually bring to mind the rocky coasts of Cape Breton or the cold waters of the North Atlantic. In the fishing grounds of Atlantic Canada, June to October […]

Growing a Scientist: Undergraduate Research 2018, part 3

Check out these posts by guest authors Deborah Leopo, Mike Miller, Whitney Marshall, and Robert Lewis about deep sea snail species, sea level rise, and tectonic modeling–these students were part of the SURFO program at URI-GSO over Summer 2018, and have some really exciting research to share! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student […]

Preparing for Research at Sea: Behind the Scenes

Research at sea is no small feat! Read this guest post by URI GSO SURFO student Anna Ward about her experiences helping prepare for a cruise expedition! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann Lab. My current research interests include environmental […]

Stuck in the middle with you: The trophic ecology of Caribbean reef sharks and large teleost coral reef predators

We often think of sharks as the top of the ocean food web, chowing down on seals and big fish to their heart’s content. That is often not the case! Where does the Caribbean reef shark fall in this hierarchy? Let’s find out. Grace CasselberryI am currently a Marine Science and Technology Doctoral student at […]

Octopus Mama Drama: Research Expedition Bonus Science

Dorado Outcrop is a small underwater mountain that first received attention from a few scientists because the seafloor that it sits upon is colder than what is expected. It ended up in the media spot-light because of the hundreds of octopuses that call it home. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, […]

Biofilms are a prominent first step in the colonization of wood-falls

A profound yet never-before-appreciated first step in the colonization of sulfur oxidizing bacteria on the surface of wood-debris in the deep-sea is attributed to sugars and other labile components of wood. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a marine research scientist who has been lucky to have had many roles […]

Megalodon: a puzzle piece to understanding ecological concerns around apex predator extinction

A Prehistoric Nightmare? The Megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon), or “big tooth” is arguably one of the scariest creatures that has ever roamed the ocean. You may have heard about the Megalodon as a prehistoric gigantic shark that dominated the ocean millions of years ago, or even that scientists are still looking for them today, just like […]

Small scale, big effect

Processes in the ocean and climate happen at all sorts of size scales. New research out of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory suggest that small physical features in the ocean might have a big effect on the global climate. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe […]

MAC-EXP: A new sediment corer designed to maintain in situ pressure conditions

The MAC-EXP, a pressure-coring experimentation and cultivation system, was designed to advance our ability to analyze the microbial processes in the deep-sea sediments, which is typically a challenge because the pressure change upon recovery can alter the in situ state. Jackson et al. (2017) describe the result of the systems first field trials. Anne M. […]

Oceanic Outlook in the New Government Climate Report

Ocean warming, acidification, sea-level-rise, and increased coastal storm intensities are just some of the stark projections highlighted in a recently-released U.S. Government climate report. Zoe GentesZoe has an M.S. in Oceanography and a B.S. in Geologic Oceanography from URI, with a minor in Writing and Rhetoric. She was recently a Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in […]

the Soul of an Octopus by Sy Montgomery

The soul of an octopus: a surprising exploration into the wonder of consciousness by Sy Montgomery is a excellent non-fiction story about getting the author’s experience getting to know herself and the world around her through the unexpected bonds with octopuses. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a marine research […]

More than just a game of tag: learning about seabird habitat use through tagging studies

Tagging seabirds has only been possible with recent developments in technology, but we can learn a ton about their distribution and behavior through tagging studies. Read on to hear how it is done! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann Lab. […]

The G.O.A.T. of sharks: Where is the greatest of all hammerhead sharks going?

The great hammerhead is one of the most interesting yet illusive large coastal shark species. Herein, we review recent work aimed at identifying where this species is residing and moving to promote better management and conservation measures. Carolyn WheelerI am currently a PhD student studying marine science at the University of Massachusetts Boston, with my […]

Growing a Scientist: Undergraduate Research 2017

Each summer, the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO) hosts undergraduate students from all over the country to participate in oceanographic research. These Summer Undergraduate Research Fellows (SURFOs) have not only been working with GSO scientists, but they have spent part of their time learning how to communicate this science to the […]

Subscribe to oceanbites

@oceanbites on Twitter