//
archives

Samantha Setta

Samantha Setta has written 19 posts for oceanbites
Image of large commercial fishing vessel using longliner techniques to catch fish, similar to those used in this study. Vessel is red and white coloring loaded with fishing equipment on deck and moving through open waters.

The ugly truth behind seafood

Some large-scale commercial fishing vessels that operate on the high seas have a problem. Read on to learn more about forced labor in global fisheries and what we can do about it. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). My research […]

Mercurial fish: Climate change and temperature could change how much mercury you’re eating

Dr. Amina Schartup’s research focuses on many important issues to both marine and human health, including methylmercury concentration in fish. Read on to learn more about Dr. Schartup’s research. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). My research interests are focused […]

It’s a cold, cold winter for Arctic phytoplankton

Ever wonder what winter is like for marine organisms? What about those that rely on light for growth? In a recent study of microscopic photosynthesizers in some of the most extreme winter conditions in the Arctic, a group of scientists set out to investigate. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the […]

SURFO Special: How do we address the massive fluoro-pollutant crisis in the United States?

Every summer, the URI Graduate School of Oceanography hosts undergraduate research interns called SURFOs. In this post learn about how categories of water pollutants could affect regulation and Tobias Kochenderfer’s 2020 SURFO research in the Lohmann Lab. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School […]

SURFO Special: From outer space to the microscope: How NASA’s satellites are helping us understand the ocean’s smallest life

Every summer, the URI Graduate School of Oceanography hosts undergraduate research interns called SURFOs. In this post learn about how ocean satellites can be used to understand microscopic organisms and Julia Lober’s 2020 SURFO research in the Mouw Lab. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) […]

Underwater musicians: estimating health of an estuary using sound

Ever hear a snapping underwater? Wonder who is making the sound? Researchers can use sound to take the pulse of an estuary. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). My research interests are focused on human impacts on the oceanic ecosystem, […]

How corals thrive in deep ocean waters

Ever wonder how corals live in the cold, dark depths of the ocean? How could climate change impact these organisms? Read on to find out more. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). My research interests are focused on human impacts […]

Antarctic Sea Ice – What do Adélie Penguins have to do with it?

In light of global climate change and warming ocean waters, is there any good news? Turns out some Antarctic penguins will benefit in the short term with less sea-ice cover. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). My research interests are […]

Fisheries and Sustainability Certification: Do the benefits outweigh the costs?

What do sustainability certification labels on fish at the market mean? How do these measures impact fishers, industry, and governments? Read on to find out more. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). My research interests are focused on human impacts […]

Turning up the heat: lab-adapted symbionts help coral survive warming waters

Ever wonder how organisms might adapt to climate change? How about humans aiding in this evolution? Read on to see how one group sought to increase coral reefs tolerance to bleaching in the lab. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). […]

Jellyfish: Future Scientists of the Sea

Is there a way to increase measurements across oceans using a hybrid of robotics and biology? In a recent study, scientists sought to answer this question using jellyfish and an engineered small ‘controller device’. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). […]

A story of success for the Cayman Island’s Nassau Grouper

Nassau Grouper are a historically overfished population in the Caribbean, but after new regulations were implemented in 2003, has the fishery recovered? Waterhouse et al. (2020) sought to answer this question using 15 years of monitoring efforts from the Cayman Islands. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode […]

An arms race: Foraging Fish vs. Rorqual Whales

Ever wonder how filter feeding whales are able to capture smaller, fast fish? The authors of this study looked at exactly how the feeding behavior of these whales allows them to catch fast, easily maneuverable foraging fish. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School […]

Lights, Camera, and the Action-Packed World of Giant Viruses

A newly discovered giant virus might even be capable of altering its hosts ability to derive energy. A virus that infects a small eukaryotic predator has the largest viral genome found in oceans to date and has several novel genes that aid in its infection of these eukaryotic organisms. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in […]

Sea Level Rise in the Age of the Paris Agreement

Global greenhouse gas emissions are resulting in global warming and climate change. Some of the effects of global warming can be seen in the present-day; however, many of the effects will not be seen for decades or centuries. The authors of this study were the first to quantify future sea-level rise as a result of […]

Artificial photosynthesis uses CO2 drawdown for fuel

Can CO2 in the world oceans be used to create a fuel source and reduce atmospheric concentration at the same time? Patterson et al. (2019) reviews the technology, resources, and locations needed to make this a reality in the near future. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode […]

Traces of human plastic pollution in ocean sediment

Is the plastic we produce being stored in our oceans’ sediments? To answer this question scientists studied a sediment core from the Santa Barbara basin dating back to 1836. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). My research interests are focused […]

Does ocean circulation provide prey for a top ocean predator?

Ocean circulation patterns are generally thought to move water from one area to another in the world’s oceans. One example of this includes eddies, swirling water masses that spin off from major ocean currents such as the Gulf Stream off the coast of the eastern U.S. Some of these eddies can bring more productive waters […]

Global Warming Increases Cold-Stun in Sea Turtles

Global warming along the eastern United States is causing sea turtles to travel further northward during the summer, but as temperatures rapidly drop in the fall these sea turtles become stranded on coastlines causing a condition known as “cold-stun”. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) […]

Instagram

  • by oceanbites 3 weeks ago
    Not all outdoor science is fieldwork. Some of the best days in the lab can be setting up experiments, especially when you get to do it outdoors. It’s an exciting mix of problem solving, precision, preparation, and teamwork. Here is
  • by oceanbites 1 month ago
    Being on a research cruise is a unique experience with the open water, 12-hour working shifts, and close quarters, but there are some familiar practices too. Here Diana is filtering seawater to gather chlorophyll for analysis, the same process on
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #oceanbites  we are featuring Hannah Collins  @hannahh_irene  Hannah works with marine suspension feeding bivalves and microplastics, investigating whether ingesting microplastics causes changes to the gut microbial community or gut tissues. She hopes to keep working
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    Leveling up - did you know that crabs have a larval phase? These are both porcelain crabs, but the one on the right is the earlier stage. It’s massive spine makes it both difficult to eat and quite conspicuous in
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Cierra Braga. Cierra works ultraviolet c (UVC) to discover how this light can be used to combat biofouling, or the growth of living things, on the hulls of ships. Here, you
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Elena Gadoutsis  @haysailor  These photos feature her “favorite marine research so far: From surveying tropical coral reefs, photographing dolphins and whales, and growing my own algae to expose it to different
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on Oceanbites we are featuring Eliza Oldach. According to Ellie, “I study coastal communities, and try to understand the policies and decisions and interactions and adaptations that communities use to navigate an ever-changing world. Most of
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Jiwoon Park with a little photographic help from Ryan Tabata at the University of Hawaii. When asked about her research, Jiwoon wrote “Just like we need vitamins and minerals to stay
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #Oceanbites  we are featuring  @riley_henning  According to Riley, ”I am interested in studying small things that make a big impact in the ocean. Right now for my master's research at the University of San Diego,
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Gabby Stedman. Gabby is interested in interested in understanding how many species of small-bodied animals there are in the deep-sea and where they live so we can better protect them from
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Shawn Wang! Shawn is “an oceanographer that studies ocean conditions of the past. I use everything from microfossils to complex computer models to understand how climate has changed in the past
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    Today we are highlighting some of our awesome new authors for  #WriterWednesday  Today we have Daniel Speer! He says, “I am driven to investigate the interface of biology, chemistry, and physics, asking questions about how organisms or biological systems respond
  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
    Here at Oceanbites we love long-term datasets. So much happens in the ocean that sometimes it can be hard to tell if a trend is a part of a natural cycle or actually an anomaly, but as we gather more
  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
    Have you ever seen a lobster molt? Because lobsters have exoskeletons, every time they grow they have to climb out of their old shell, leaving them soft and vulnerable for a few days until their new shell hardens. Young, small
  • by oceanbites 7 months ago
    A lot of zooplankton are translucent, making it much easier to hide from predators. This juvenile mantis shrimp was almost impossible to spot floating in the water, but under a dissecting scope it’s features really come into view. See the
  • by oceanbites 7 months ago
    This is a clump of Dead Man’s Fingers, scientific name Codium fragile. It’s native to the Pacific Ocean and is invasive where I found it on the east coast of the US. It’s a bit velvety, and the coolest thing
  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    You’ve probably heard of jellyfish, but have you heard of salps? These gelatinous sea creatures band together to form long chains, but they can also fall apart and will wash up onshore like tiny gemstones that squish. Have you seen
  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    Check out what’s happening on a cool summer research cruise! On the  #neslter  summer transect cruise, we deployed a tow sled called the In Situ Icthyoplankton Imaging System. This can take pictures of gelatinous zooplankton (like jellyfish) that would be
  • by oceanbites 9 months ago
    Did you know horseshoe crabs have more than just two eyes? In these juveniles you can see another set in the middle of the shell. Check out our website to learn about some awesome horseshoe crab research.  #oceanbites   #plankton   #horseshoecrabs 
  • by oceanbites 9 months ago
    Feeling a bit flattened by the week? So are these summer flounder larvae. Fun fact: flounder larvae start out with their eyes set like normal fish, but as they grow one of their eyes migrates to meet the other and
WP2Social Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com