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Noise

This category contains 14 posts

Crash Compilation #1: A review of vessel collisions with marine animals

As more people take to the seas, either for recreation or trade, sea life encounters have also increased. These encounters can be awe-inspiring, but they can also be dangerous—both for the animals in the water and the people aboard the ships. Click here to read more about the challenges of assessing and preventing boat strikes, […]

Underwater musicians: estimating health of an estuary using sound

Ever hear a snapping underwater? Wonder who is making the sound? Researchers can use sound to take the pulse of an estuary. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). My research interests are focused on human impacts on the oceanic ecosystem, […]

Noise Pollution Stresses Sea Urchins

You may have heard that marine mammals are affected by manmade ocean noise. But have you ever wondered whether smaller critters like sea urchins are impacted? A team led by Vazzana is the first to use coelomic fluid to assess urchin responses to noise. Constance SartorConstance is a graduate student at the University of Guam […]

Sounds, Stress, and Stingrays

Have you ever wondered if stingrays can hear noise? Sharks, skates, and rays have multiple sensory organs to help then navigate their environment and hunt for food; for example, jelly-filled pores on their body allow them to sense electric fields in the water. However, less is known about how well these animals can hear. The […]

Life in the Abyss: the ecological impacts of deep-sea mining

Did you know that about 95% of the ocean is unexplored? The deep ocean is logistically very difficult to access, so how do scientists study organisms that live hundreds of meters below the sea surface? The landscape of the deep-sea is diverse and certain structures such as polymetallic nodules, supports a vast array of marine […]

The Sound of (Fish) Music

The ocean contains a symphony of sounds. A new study describes a novel method for capturing the chorus “sung” by fish. Emily ChuaI am a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University where I am developing an underwater instrument to study the coastal ocean.  I have a multi-disciplinary background in physics and oceanography (and some engineering), and […]

Can you hear me now? Investigating sound across the Atlantic Ocean

The ocean is full of sounds, ranging from marine mammal conversations to man-made noises used to investigate the seafloor.  Ocean noise pollution makes it hard for marine mammals to communicate with each other. Read more to learn how scientists measure sound in the Atlantic Ocean. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School […]

Oil rigs, the food trucks of the sea?

We humans don’t always take time to assess how we impact other environments; more often we survey before we enter the ecosystem, but what happens when we leave? Oil rigs in the North Sea have provided a great opportunity for scientists to start investigating. Click here to find out more! Andrea SchlunkI am a former […]

Listening for Symptoms: A new use for hydrophones in the face of harmful algal blooms

Whales aren’t the only animals hydrophones can detect out in the ocean. In fact, in the near future it might be possible to listen in on animals like scallops and determine if they’re healthy or not. Intrigued? Click here for more! Andrea SchlunkI am a former PhD student from the University of Rhode Island, having […]

Loud and Order: How reef fish vocalize to keep schools cohesive

Many animals use vocalizations to send signals to their group, but never before has this been documented in fish, until now. Researchers have found a reef fish that uses vocalizations in order to keep their schools together. Read on to find out how. Gordon OberPostdoctoral Researcher, Claremont McKenna College I am currently a postdoc at […]

Eavesdropping prawns get more than they bargained for

Marine animals living below the surface have to put up with noise generated by human activity. Heavy shipping traffic can bring a lot of noise. How does the common prawn respond? Sarah GiltzI am a doctoral candidate in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Tulane University. My research focuses on the larval dispersal and development of […]

In the Heart of the Sea: Following the Song of Humpback Whales to Study Migration

Every year, humpback whales journey across the ocean. Using passive acoustics to study whale song, scientists are able to follow the path of humpback whales and learn about their migratory patterns. Read (and listen) to find out more! Aditi TripathyHello! I received my B.S. Marine Biology with a minor in Acoustics at the University of […]

Rising above the noise

Oceanbites is still “ringing” in the New Year! Find out how in a sea full of noisy fish one can stand out from the crowd. And yes, fish can make noise! Gordon OberPostdoctoral Researcher, Claremont McKenna College I am currently a postdoc at Keck Sciences, Claremont McKenna College. I work with Dr. Sarah Gilman, measuring […]

Small boats drowning out natural reef noise?

Don’t you hate when noises interfere with your daily activities and conversations? We create lots of noise in the environment and need to know more about it. Today’s oceanbites focuses on a study of man-made noise on coral reefs. Check it out! Rebecca FlynnI am a graduate of the University of Notre Dame (B.S.) and […]

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  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
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  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
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