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Victoria Treadaway

Victoria Treadaway has written 14 posts for oceanbites

Warmer Waters Will Trap Nutrients Down Deep

Climate change is warming the ocean and altering how deep water is transported. Researchers in this study estimate that by the year 2300 these changes will have drastically altered where nutrients are available in the ocean causing up to a 15% decline in net primary production globally! Read more to see how this will happen […]

How warming weather will open the mercury bank in Alaska

Researchers in this study measured mercury in Alaska and calculated the mercury to organic carbon ratio. This ratio was used to estimate where the dominant mercury storage is in the Northern Hemisphere. Read more to find out what they discovered! Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University […]

Adding Oil to the Marine Snow Mix

Can oil spills lead to large marine snow events? After the Deepwater Horizon oil spill people noticed large marine snow aggregates in the water. Researchers in this study investigated how these abnormally large aggregates formed. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. I am […]

Let it snow, let it snow…make it snow?

This time of year kids (and adults) around the world start wishing for a white Christmas. Researchers in this study are conducting a 5-year experiment in Wyoming to see if they can make snow. Read more to see how scientists are making snow. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography […]

Green vs. Blue: How Green Turtles Might Limit Blue Carbon Storage

Green turtle populations are on the rise, which is a good thing, right? There has been recent concern that the increasing population will negatively impact seagrass role in blue carbon sequestration. Researchers found that turtles are decreasing the rate of carbon uptake into sediment but seagrass meadows remain active carbon sinks. Victoria TreadawayI am a […]

Your worldview: how values influence support of renewable energy

There are a lot of moving parts to consider when developing renewable energy projects. Read more to learn how people’s perceptions and primary values influence their opinion (and voting stance) on environmental projects in their community. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. I […]

Observing Ocean Clarity from Space

A Secchi Disk is a simple tool used to measure water transparency and has been used for over 100 years! One thing water transparency can tell us if there is enough light available for primary production. Recently satellite data has been adapted to monitor ocean water transparency as well. Researchers in this study used a […]

Can you hear me now? Investigating sound across the Atlantic Ocean

The ocean is full of sounds, ranging from marine mammal conversations to man-made noises used to investigate the seafloor.  Ocean noise pollution makes it hard for marine mammals to communicate with each other. Read more to learn how scientists measure sound in the Atlantic Ocean. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School […]

A regional perspective on ocean acidification

The regional impacts of ocean acidification are unclear. Researchers measured pH in the intertidal waters off the western coast of the United States. Read more to find out if the water pH was consistent along the coast and whether it is higher or lower than the global average pH of 8.1. Victoria TreadawayI am a […]

An arsenic surprise: How our buried past will catch up with us

Global sea level is expected to rise 0.8 to 1 meter by 2100 and may release arsenic trapped in soil. Researchers investigated how this arsenic release would impact the biogeochemical cycling of coastal water systems as they are inundated with water due to sea level rise. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate […]

I’m Gonna Soak Up the Sun: Sunscreen’s Impact on Coral Communities

Sunscreen prevents skin cancer but may also be linked to coral bleaching and harm to coral larvae. Read more to find out what scientists found in corals off the coast of Hong Kong when they sampled for common sunscreen UV protection chemicals. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography at […]

Time to update the history books: the future of radionuclides in the ocean

Scientists measured three radionuclides (137-cesium, tritium, and radiocarbon) to understand how Fukushima derived radionuclides are distributed in the North Pacific Ocean. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. I am an atmospheric chemist studying organic acids in the troposphere to better understand their role […]

More than cow burps: the many sources of methane

Methane is an important, and often forgotten, greenhouse gas. It comes from a variety of sources including wetlands, rice paddies, and natural gas operations. This article explores methane’s role in our changing climate and investigates some natural and anthropogenic sources. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University […]

What can tuna tell us about mercury emissions?

North America’s mercury emissions have declined over the last two decades. Researchers have found a connection between the declining emissions and the mercury level in tuna. Read more to find out how they made this link and what it could mean for the future. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of […]

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