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Atmospheric Chemistry

This category contains 7 posts

Pteropods are Ptough: How one of the ocean’s most fragile creatures may cope with climate change

Climate change, due to the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning, is arguably the most important issue facing our planet. One of the most detrimental changes already in progress is the shifting pH of the world’s oceans, known as ocean acidification. Although the speed with which the planet is changing does not […]

Let it snow, let it snow…make it snow?

This time of year kids (and adults) around the world start wishing for a white Christmas. Researchers in this study are conducting a 5-year experiment in Wyoming to see if they can make snow. Read more to see how scientists are making snow. Victoria TreadawayI am a PhD candidate at the Graduate School of Oceanography […]

Mercury at elevated levels observed in only some elephant seals, but why?

Mercury: we know it from old-school thermometers and we know if from sushi; and now we know that the distribution in the ocean is reflected in the blood of northern elephant seals. N.B. No elephant seals were harmed during this research. Anne M. HartwellHello, welcome to Oceanbites! My name is Annie, I’m a marine research […]

Tiny plankton make big clouds brighter

Scientists use ocean color from satellites to show that tiny ocean plankton may be responsible for making clouds brighter around Antarctica. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and it’s role in climate. For my research I sometimes spend […]

Marine microbial activity poses restrictions on cloud formation

Researchers from Scripps Institute of Oceanography have found that humble heterotrophic bacteria in the surface waters of the ocean can have far reaching impacts – extending beyond the typical marine microbial system and into the atmosphere to affect how clouds are formed. Irvin HuangA recent convert to oceanography, I’m studying under Dr. Anne McElroy at […]

One billion and one anaerobic nights: on the journey to atmospheric oxidation

Take a breather, and learn how cyanobacteria struggled to bring the world oxygen. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

WACS cruise track superimposed on maps of satellite-derived chlorophyll-a concenatrtions using the Aqua Modis satellite.

A break-up in the relationship between organic carbon in sea spray and chlorophyll-a concentrations

The transfer of organic matter from the surface sea water to sea spray aerosols appears constant despite the concentration of chlorophyll-a. This could suggest that satellite-derived estimates of organic matter in sea spray are inaccurate in the open ocean Kari St.LaurentI received a Ph.D. in oceanography in 2014 from the Graduate School of Oceanography (URI) […]

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