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Restoration

This category contains 6 posts

Protecting Our Fish and Birds by Protecting Their Wetland Homes

Wetlands are the link between land and water, and are some of the most productive ecosystems on Earth. They need our protection, for the commercial fisheries we depend upon, for the recreational opportunities they provide us, and for the benefit of the species that use them.

Working with the coast

The coast is very dynamic and at the constant mercy of wind and water energy. Often times, humans will try to control the coast by constructing seawalls and groins. Such projects have major impacts on sediment transport that can affect natural ecosystems and recreational beaches. Read here about a group of scientists who sought to quantify just how much of an impact seawall and groin development had on a section of coast in southeast India.

Room to Grow

When natural ecosystems are destroyed from anthropogenic development there exists a common notion that a replacement can be replanted somewhere else. One has to wonder though; what if the ecosystem destroyed cannot be replaced into the same role it once had. Scientists investigate if planted mangroves in the Philippines change the natural mangrove areas surrounding the restoration area, and to determine if there are differences in species diversity between planted and natural systems.

Summiting Sand Dune Crests: A challenge of restoration

With spring break upon us, we’re all looking for a way to unwind and have fun. For some areas relying on tourism for economic stability, though, fragile habitats can often be overlooked in an effort to keep money flowing in. Click here to find out more about new research being conducted on restoring one of Brazil’s vulnerable microbiomes: sand dunes.

Solving Big Dam Problems

The US has a lot of dams. Probably far more than you ever imagined possible. Many of these dams are around 100 years old. How long does it take to restore a riverine ecosystem to a more natural state after a century of alteration by a dam? Scientists addressed a portion of this question by measuring the return of salmon to a section of river previously blocked by the dam and the use of the nutrients delivered by these salmon by other organisms in the area.

Oh Where, Oh Where Should This Oyster Reef Go?

Where indeed? Oyster reef restoration and use for shoreline protection requires some planning to maximize effectiveness. Find out more in today’s oceanbites!

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