//archives

ocean engineering

This category contains 32 posts

Life in the Abyss: the ecological impacts of deep-sea mining

Did you know that about 95% of the ocean is unexplored? The deep ocean is logistically very difficult to access, so how do scientists study organisms that live hundreds of meters below the sea surface? The landscape of the deep-sea is diverse and certain structures such as polymetallic nodules, supports a vast array of marine […]

The HyperDiver: A New (Hyper-) Intelligent Way to Map the Ocean

German researchers have developed a new system–based on sophisticated imaging technology and artificial intelligence–which promises to revolutionize how we map coral reefs. Emily ChuaI am a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University where I am developing an underwater instrument to study the coastal ocean.  I have a multi-disciplinary background in physics and oceanography (and some engineering), […]

City Marine Parks: The Water Parks of the Future

Did you love going to the water park as a kid? The authors of this paper have come up with a new kind of water park to help improve life in coastal cities and make the most of “blue space.” Ashley MickensI recently graduated with a degree in Environmental Earth Science and Sustainability from Miami […]

Jellyfish: Future Scientists of the Sea

Is there a way to increase measurements across oceans using a hybrid of robotics and biology? In a recent study, scientists sought to answer this question using jellyfish and an engineered small ‘controller device’. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO). […]

Deep Breathing Underwater

The Labrador Sea is one of the lungs of the ocean. A new study finds that it is taking an even deeper breath than expected—making it more vulnerable to climate change than thought. Emily ChuaI am a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University where I am developing an underwater instrument to study the coastal ocean.  I […]

A High-Flying Aquatic Robot

Inspired by the flying squid, researchers have built a robot that can launch itself from the water surface using water-reactive fuel. Emily ChuaI am a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University where I am developing an underwater instrument to study the coastal ocean.  I have a multi-disciplinary background in physics and oceanography (and some engineering), and […]

Artificial photosynthesis uses CO2 drawdown for fuel

Can CO2 in the world oceans be used to create a fuel source and reduce atmospheric concentration at the same time? Patterson et al. (2019) reviews the technology, resources, and locations needed to make this a reality in the near future. Samantha SettaI’m a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab at the University of Rhode […]

Sailing Solo: An alternative way to monitor harmful algal blooms

Have you ever heard about a harmful algal bloom? Do you know what causes them? Or how scientists monitor them? Read on to learn about how a group of scientists from Mote Marine Lab in Florida paired up with Navocean, Inc to create the first autonomous small sailboat to monitor blooms in coastal, shallow water […]

The Sound of (Fish) Music

The ocean contains a symphony of sounds. A new study describes a novel method for capturing the chorus “sung” by fish. Emily ChuaI am a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University where I am developing an underwater instrument to study the coastal ocean.  I have a multi-disciplinary background in physics and oceanography (and some engineering), and […]

Acquisition and curation and management, oh my!

Data management is an often over looked part of the scientific process. But it is quickly becoming the elephant in the room as oceanographers are increasing the amount of information they collect. A group from Kiel, Germany recently proposed a set of best practices to kick start the conversation. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student […]

Swimming with the fishes

Studying organisms in their natural habitat is tricky business (and not in the GoodFellas sense). A recent paper from MIT announces the arrival of SoFi, a bio-inspired robot that swims like the fish it is designed to study. And it is run with a Wii controller…underwater video games have arrived! Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD […]

I saw the Sun!

It opened up my eyes, I saw the sun! Well, in this case, it opened up my light polarization sensor which allowed me to infer the Sun heading and elevation. I think that throws off the rhyme scheme… Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe […]

MAC-EXP: A new sediment corer designed to maintain in situ pressure conditions

The MAC-EXP, a pressure-coring experimentation and cultivation system, was designed to advance our ability to analyze the microbial processes in the deep-sea sediments, which is typically a challenge because the pressure change upon recovery can alter the in situ state. Jackson et al. (2017) describe the result of the systems first field trials. Anne M. […]

Making waves in the Southern Ocean

Scientists from the Applied Physics Laboratory in Seattle tested a wave-powered ocean robot in the treacherous, turbulent waters of the Drake Passage for the first time in the name of science. Veronica TamsittI’m a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla California. My research is focused on the Southern Ocean circulation and […]

E’rybody move to yer left

Particulate matter shows up everywhere in oceanography: remote sensing, paleoceanography, climate studies…the list goes on and on. Despite how often particles show up in the literature, very little is known about how this matter is effected by the motion of the water it is immersed. A new study out of Harbor Branch demonstrates they may […]

Growing a Scientist: Undergraduate Research 2017

Each summer, the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO) hosts undergraduate students from all over the country to participate in oceanographic research. These Summer Undergraduate Research Fellows (SURFOs) have not only been working with GSO scientists, but they have spent part of their time learning how to communicate this science to the […]

Ctrl+P: 3D printing applications for oceanography

3D printing and oceanography? Check out the fascinating new research advancements made in ocean sciences using one of the most innovative technologies of the 21st century! Prabarna GangulyI’m a fourth year PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology at Northeastern University. My research focuses on the impact of early life stress in the form of […]

OceanTech: profiling the sub-surface via Argo floats

The final post of theme week introduces the Argo array, an international effort to understand the ocean’s sub-surface via technological floats that enable continuous, real-time temperature and salinity data collection. Data collected from the Argo array can be coupled with satellite and shipboard measurements to provide a more complete understanding of global ocean dynamics. Anne […]

Mucus flux and other amazing discoveries with underwater cameras

Scientists have been taking pictures underwater since the turn of the 19th century. But only recently have researchers and engineers started designing special systems to answer some of the most vexing questions in oceanography. Just last week, a group from MBARI published their findings from one such instrument about zooplankton mucus. Eric OrensteinEric is a […]

Ocean Tech: Using Robots to Conduct Deep-Sea Research

The deep sea is the largest habitat on Earth, but with freezing water and high pressures it is difficult for scientists to study this ecosystem. With the help of technological advances over the past decades, it is becoming easier to unveil some of the mysteries of the deep. Read on to find out how. Ashley […]

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