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ocean engineering

This category contains 12 posts
The Lilypad Wave Energy Converter (WEC). Credit: Energy Island.

New Year, new innovations: energy and climate science

Research in marine renewable energy and climate systems will grow ever more important in the future. The research for these areas are not just done on the coast, however – I ventured into the mountains to learn more.

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Sub sea ice technology aims to expand Arctic plankton surveys

A German research team tested out three devices for studying plankton in Arctic sea ice. These new methods might allow scientists to expand Arctic primary production studies and yield new insight into these important, understudied ecosystems.

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Storm Troopers! Robots collect ocean data during hurricanes

Hurricane prediction models are constantly improving as we create more innovative ways to study the growth and development of storms. In 2011, a team from Rutgers University sent an autonomous underwater vehicle into the projected path of Hurricane Irene to measure ocean conditions before, during, and after it passed.

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Manipulating ship wakes to reflect light could help fight climate change

The tiny bubbles produced by ship’s wakes reflect light and cool the planet. Could they be manipulated to counteract global warming?

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A cloudy future for climate engineering

Pumping reflective aerosols into the atmosphere may hold promise for cooling the climate. But once we start, we won’t be able to stop.

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One person’s noise, is another person’s data

Measuring the heat content of deep ocean waters is critical to understanding how our global climate system works. It is also very difficult to do on a large scale. A group at the University of Georgia recently proposed a new technique to take the temperature of the deep ocean using only ambient noise and passive hydrophones.

doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JTECH-D-15-0035.1

Echoes in the deep: Robots with fish finders

You might call it the Batmobile of the sea: Scientists put sound based fish finders into an underwater robot to get closer to the creatures they want to study.

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An exact replica of a coral reef right in the office!

In order to better understand coral reef complexity and structure researchers developed a cost effective way to 3D print coral reefs. Using these 3D models, researchers were able to dissect the complexity of coral reefs and better understand their intricate growth patterns.

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Staying ahead of commercial exploitation in the deep sea

The first seafloor massive sulfide mine in the Pacific is expected to begin commercial operation in 2017. Licenses have already been granted and environmental impact assessments conducted, but we know little about the marine communities surrounding sulfide deposits in the ocean. This study characterizes such communities in a future mining exploration site.

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Sensors probe oceans for answers

Deep-diving ocean drones confirm continued warming of the ocean’s abyss due to Earth’s energy imbalance.

Figure 5. Plane spreading oil dispersants over floating oil.

“Magic Sand” Cleans up floating oil

Currently, spreading dispersants is the most common way to stabilize surface oil after oil spill. These dispersants divide oil into small droplets which are more available to bacteria. However, this application of dispersants is not applicable near the coast and the toxicity of dispersants remains to be studied. Natural granular material could be a more eco-friendly tool in fixing coastal floating oil.

http://people.clarkson.edu/~pyapa/Thermovent/smoker.jpg

Happy Samples

How frustrating it must be to spend a bunch of money to get to the field, only to find out the samples collected were contaminated. This piece reviews the effort of a group of science engineers from China to eliminate sample contamination when collecting hydrothermal vent fluids in shallow waters.

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