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Conservation

This category contains 156 posts

Will dead corals help reefs recover from disturbances?

This is a guest post by Kelly Wong. Kelly is a current Master’s student at California Sate University, Northridge in Dr. Peter Edmunds’ Polyp Lab. Her research focuses on the role of dead coral rubble in modulating coral populations and reef community dynamics. Diana FontaineI am a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab studying Biological […]

The Circle of Life: Understanding Lionfish Life Cycles

We know who’s the king of the jungle, but who’s the king of the reef? Lionfish may look cool, but they are actually invasive in the Atlantic and the adults have no natural predators. This new paper explains how understanding the early life stages of lionfish may help control their population in the Western Atlantic […]

The Regenerative Power of Whale Sharks

How fast can a whale shark heal from a wound? For the first time, researchers look deeper at the healing power of whale sharks which can even include the ability to re-grow a fin! Elena GadoutsisI have always been happiest in nature – exploring forests, traveling to the ocean, or working with wildlife. After obtaining my […]

Solo human casts fishing line into sea from a rocky cliff

Can a little bit of a good thing be worse than nothing at all?

The world’s oceans are increasingly managed as Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) where human activities are carefully regulated to support ocean health. But the amount of protection in a marine protected area varies widely. A recent study begs the question — is partial protection actually worse than no protection at all? Ellie OldachHello! I’m a third-year […]

Mommy dearest: Female sperm whales are the pillars of their families

Still living with your mom? Nothing to be embarrassed about – especially if you are a sperm whale! Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders called axolotls. In my free time, I like to read science fiction, bake, go on walks […]

Does coral size matter?

Nina Bean is a 2nd year master’s student at the California State University, Northridge in Dr. Peter Edmunds’ Polyp Lab. She is studying how coral traits and competitive outcomes scale with coral size at various life stages. When she is not doing research, she enjoys rock climbing, running, and underwater photography. Read her guest post […]

Plastic in the ocean chokes albatrosses

Albatrosses are amazing wanderers of the ocean, but they are threatened by ocean plastic pollution. Read on to learn more about how plastic leads to albatrosses’ death and why it’s a growing problem. Jiwoon ParkI am a PhD student in chemical oceanography at University of Washington. I am studying how different forms of metals in […]

Warming up to the neighborhood: a gentoo penguin’s new digs

With warming temperatures, scientists expect to see species popping up in environments where they’ve previously been absent. Climate change virtually guarantees animals will move into new regions, either following prey or searching for more familiar temperatures. In the case of the gentoo penguin, it means a new frontier as colonies push to the edges of […]

Missing the (Kelp) Forest for the Trees: An Overlooked Factor in Blue Carbon Storage

A recent study exposes an overlooked carbon sink in the form of kelp forests. According to scientists’ estimates, a kelp forest in Australia sequesters 3% of global carbon per year, and this has important implications for the rest of the global carbon budget. Ashley MickensI recently graduated with a degree in Environmental Earth Science and […]

Corals and scuba diver underwater

How to Plan a Marine Protected Area

The start of a new decade offers a chance to reflect on the past. We’ve missed our target conservation goals for global marine protected areas (MPAs), but maybe — just maybe — we’ve learned some important lessons about ocean governance along the way. In a recent paper, authors trace the history of MPA development in […]

Protecting the unknown: how scientists are evaluating conservation efforts in undescribed areas of the deep sea

Large areas of the seafloor are designated for deep-sea mining, but much of this seascape has not been sampled or described. Learn how scientists McQuid et al. layered environmental data to map potentially important habitats for conservation. Gabrielle StedmanI am currently a 3rd year PhD student in Biological Oceanography at the University of Hawai‘i at […]

Fisheries, Food and the Future

As we approach 2021, the idea of “the future” seems closer than ever before. In a recent article, Cabral and his team propose a futuristic network of marine protected areas to help meet the challenges of a rapidly changing world. Ashley MickensI recently graduated with a degree in Environmental Earth Science and Sustainability from Miami […]

Drowning in bad news about the ocean? Cheer up with these uplifting stories!

Bad news fatigue is real, and a strategy called ocean optimism means to tackle it. These success stories of victories in ocean preservation are sure to keep your spirits up! Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders called axolotls. In my […]

Eutrophication in the Chesapeake Bay

This post is in support of #BlackInMarineScience week highlighting Black scientists who have contributed to and are currently working in the marine science field. To find out more visit https://blackinmarsci.github.io/index.html. Ashley MickensI recently graduated with a degree in Environmental Earth Science and Sustainability from Miami University of Ohio, and I’m currently working as a marine […]

An up-close view of a great white shark's head.

Peek-a-Boo, I See You and My Food Too

Imagine yourself floating in a metal cage off the side of a boat. You are waiting to see something rare, exciting, and in all reality dangerous if proper precautions are not used. Then you see it, a dark gray dorsal fin breaking the surface of the water. One of the ocean’s apex predators, a great […]

Two by two includes corals too? Researchers call for a coral “Noah’s Ark”

In the Bible, the story of Noah’s Ark describes a storm so intense and so long that the earth is covered in water, killing all except those protected in a massive boat. Today, coral scientists are proposing their own “Noah’s Ark,” but this time the relentless storm is climate change. Kristin HuizengaI am a PhD […]

No language bounds in the ocean

What happens when an animal is found outside of its native range? Does it take over? How does it get there? A recent study developed a multilingual invasive species screening kit to track where marine creatures travel in the ocean. Diana FontaineI am a PhD student in the Rynearson Lab studying Biological Oceanography at the […]

“Bienvenidos” to Baja California, Baby White Sharks!

Tamborin, E., Hoyos-Padilla, M., Sánchez-González, A., Hernández-Herrera, A., Elorriaga-Verplancken, F., Galván Magaña, F. (2019). “New Nursery Area for White Sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.” Turk. J. Fish.& Aquat. Sci. 20(4), 325-329. Big Travelers! Great white sharks, or simply white sharks, are considered one of the largest predators in the sea. They are […]

Microplastics, Canned Fish, and You: How plastic pollution may play a role in your next lunch

Did you know that many plastic items can shed tiny particles called microplastics? These microplastics are present everywhere in our environment, from the sea to the air. But how prevalent are they, and do they pose harm to humans? Researchers attempted to answer this question by studying a common food item – canned fish. Francesca […]

From ancient blood come modern cures, or, How Horseshoe Crabs and Medicine Intertwined

If you’ve ever had a vaccination, congratulations, you’re linked to the ocean! Somewhere along the way, that vaccine batch was deemed safe thanks to a test that uses chemicals only found (naturally) in horseshoe crab blood. Though as the human population grows, we’re realizing this natural source will come under more pressure. Click here to […]

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