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Gabrielle Stedman

Gabrielle Stedman has written 5 posts for oceanbites

A shell of a ride: Pteropod survival through past mass extinction events and insights into present climate change

By looking at DNA and fossils of pelagic sea snails, Dr. Peijnenburg and colleagues are beginning to understand how this group has withstood past climate change, and how they may survive current ocean acidification. Gabrielle StedmanI am currently a 3rd year PhD student in Biological Oceanography at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. I use […]

Upward and onward: how deep-sea larvae utilize vertical swimming to disperse across ocean basins

Deep-sea larvae show vastly different dispersal ability and pathways based on simulating how they swim. Gabrielle StedmanI am currently a 3rd year PhD student in Biological Oceanography at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. I use DNA found in the environment (eDNA), like a forensic scientist, to detect deep-sea animals and where they live. Much […]

Relative body size and major size classifications. Figure courtesy of Gabrielle Stedman

Oh where, oh where can micro-organisms be?

Does the width of 10 strands of human hair matter compared to the size of an entire ocean? A new study shows how small distinctions in body-size amongst micro-organisms is the difference between occupying whole ocean basins and just sub-regions. Gabrielle StedmanI am currently a 3rd year PhD student in Biological Oceanography at the University […]

Telling time in the deep sea

Can animals tell time in the pitch black of the deep-sea? Find out how researchers Dr. Audrey Mat and others discovered that hydrothermal vent mussels use the motion of the ocean to pace their days. Gabrielle StedmanI am currently a 3rd year PhD student in Biological Oceanography at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. I […]

Hotspots of geology, biology, and economic interest

There is growing interest to exploit the resources of deep-sea hydrothermal vents to support the demand for electronic manufacturing. We don’t know how mining activities will affect these ecosystems or how the vent community will adapt to perturbations. Scientists are finding faster and easier ways to study the biodiversity and dynamics before foreseeable mining. Gabrielle […]

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