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Eric Orenstein

Eric Orenstein has written 34 posts for oceanbites

Small currents influence small creatures

Phytoplankton, the tiny photosynthesizing organisms in the ocean, tend to just go with the flow. Even the smallest currents can push them around. But how much does this rearranging actual matter for plankton populations? Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe Laboratory for Underwater Imaging […]

I like to move it, move it: Krill boogie down all year

Krill, the tiny organisms that feed the Southern Ocean, have long been thought to be pretty mellow in the winter. As it turns out, it is quite the party down there year around! Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe Laboratory for Underwater Imaging focuses […]

Acquisition and curation and management, oh my!

Data management is an often over looked part of the scientific process. But it is quickly becoming the elephant in the room as oceanographers are increasing the amount of information they collect. A group from Kiel, Germany recently proposed a set of best practices to kick start the conversation. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student […]

Smart sampling of the world’s oceans

The ocean is a big, dynamic environment – a combination that makes it incredibly challenging to efficiently study. In a new paper, Mark Costello proposes dividing the ocean into Ecological Management Units to help dictate what gets measured and when. The method could help scientists more effectively deploy their resource to explore our world’s seas. […]

Swimming with the fishes

Studying organisms in their natural habitat is tricky business (and not in the GoodFellas sense). A recent paper from MIT announces the arrival of SoFi, a bio-inspired robot that swims like the fish it is designed to study. And it is run with a Wii controller…underwater video games have arrived! Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD […]

Arctic Lights

We often think of the Arctic as a cold, dark place. But as sea ice continues to recede in the far north, the Arctic ocean might get quite a bit lighter. A new study out of Norway suggests these changes could alter the behavior of a particularly important type of plankton. Eric OrensteinEric is a […]

I saw the Sun!

It opened up my eyes, I saw the sun! Well, in this case, it opened up my light polarization sensor which allowed me to infer the Sun heading and elevation. I think that throws off the rhyme scheme… Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe […]

Effects may vary

For the past several decades, satellite data has indicated that our ocean’s height is on the rise. But little effort has gone to looking at this trend, in detail, at the local level. Dr. Benjamin Hamlington argues that such local changes are highly variable and have consequences for people planning for future coastal management. Eric […]

Small scale, big effect

Processes in the ocean and climate happen at all sorts of size scales. New research out of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory suggest that small physical features in the ocean might have a big effect on the global climate. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe […]

Mussel and flow

Mussels are nearly ubiquitous in coastal ecosystems. As filter feeders, they are critical for sifting out sediment and nutrients washed into the ocean from land. Despite their importance, scientists have only recently begun to tease out how mussels manage to efficiently get all that stuff into their shells. The answer could have far reaching implications […]

E’rybody move to yer left

Particulate matter shows up everywhere in oceanography: remote sensing, paleoceanography, climate studies…the list goes on and on. Despite how often particles show up in the literature, very little is known about how this matter is effected by the motion of the water it is immersed. A new study out of Harbor Branch demonstrates they may […]

Connecting production to glacial meltwater

As sea-ice disappears, many scientists predict that primary production will increase in high latitude regions. A Danish group adds some nuance to this prediction based on a recent study off the coast of Greenland. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe Laboratory for Underwater Imaging […]

The Once and Future Ocean

A newly collected sediment core from the Labrador Current gave Dr. Harunur Rashid a glimpse of the ancient ocean. What he saw might help inform our predictions of the future climate. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe Laboratory for Underwater Imaging focuses on developing […]

Mucus flux and other amazing discoveries with underwater cameras

Scientists have been taking pictures underwater since the turn of the 19th century. But only recently have researchers and engineers started designing special systems to answer some of the most vexing questions in oceanography. Just last week, a group from MBARI published their findings from one such instrument about zooplankton mucus. Eric OrensteinEric is a […]

Put your cilia in the air and wave ‘em like you just don’t care

A new study out of Woods Hole sheds some light on how marine phytoplankton enhance their ability to take up nutrients. Using fancy cameras and powerful models, the researchers suggest that short, rapid swimming bursts allow organisms to escape to greener pastures. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His […]

Dawn of the age of Aquarius…total alkalinity measurements

While not as exciting as the new era of peace predicted by 5th Dimension, it is pretty cool that scientists can measure ocean chemistry from space. The marvels of modern technology, amiright? Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe Laboratory for Underwater Imaging focuses on […]

Senators propose bill to ensure independence of federal researchers

Last week, a group of Senators introduced legislation that aims to preserve the independence of U.S. government scientists. The Scientific Integrity Act instructs executive branch administrators to implement policies to ensure that data and results be disseminated in a timely and open manner. The bill, if enacted, would help separate the government’s scientific output from […]

Studying plankton from an atmospheric satellite

Scientists found a way to repurpose data from an atmospheric satellite to study the tiny creatures at the base of most ocean food webs. The instrument, originally designed to study aerosols, allowed researchers to build the most complete record of polar plankton activity ever assembled. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution […]

Sub sea ice technology aims to expand Arctic plankton surveys

A German research team tested out three devices for studying plankton in Arctic sea ice. These new methods might allow scientists to expand Arctic primary production studies and yield new insight into these important, understudied ecosystems. Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe Laboratory for […]

The ocean is my cake

Or, to be more thematically appropriate, pie. Pumpkin pie. Because, if we’re being honest, pumpkin pie is the superior Thanksgiving pie. [Editor’s note: This is merely the author’s opinion. Clearly, chocolate pudding pie is the superior Thanksgiving pie] Eric OrensteinEric is a PhD student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research in the Jaffe […]

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  • by oceanbites 7 months ago
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  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
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  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    This is a clump of Dead Man’s Fingers, scientific name Codium fragile. It’s native to the Pacific Ocean and is invasive where I found it on the east coast of the US. It’s a bit velvety, and the coolest thing
  • by oceanbites 9 months ago
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  • by oceanbites 10 months ago
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