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Ashley Marranzino

Ashley Marranzino has written 53 posts for oceanbites

What do octopuses dream of when they take a little octopus snooze?

Sleep is critical to a healthy lifestyle for humans and other animals. New research shows that even octopuses cycle through similar snoozing schedules, highlighting the deep evolutionary lineage and extreme importance of sleep within the animal kingdom. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island where I studied the sensory biology […]

Schooling fish inspire underwater robot communication

Scientists and engineers frequently draw inspiration from the natural world around them. Swarms of insects and birds inspired the development of mass-coordinated aerial and terrestrial drones. Learn how a team of researchers out of Harvard University turned to schooling fish to develop synchronized swimming robots. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of […]

Damselfish farmers domesticated mysid shrimp

Farming and animal domestication are trademarks of establishing stable human civilizations. But we are not the only species to develop these methods. Reef-dwelling damselfishes known for farming their own algal gardens have recently been discovered tending to domesticated mysid shrimps. Read more about how and why this domestication developed. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree […]

Under pressure: Amphipod uses aluminum to survive in the deep sea

Crushing pressures and freezing temperatures prevent many animals from surviving in the deepest depths of our oceans; yet, somehow, a deep-sea amphipod beats all odds and is able to survive and flourish where few other animals can. Scientists have revealed how these amphipods survive under so much pressure. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from […]

Fishermen help scientists uncover the secret life of cod

Fishermen and scientists often butt heads when it comes to cod fisheries. But when the two groups work together, they can reveal important insights into cod biology that make regulations more effective for everyone. Learn how fishermen in the Baltic Sea helped scientists study declining cod populations. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the […]

Ocean Noise Pollution Changes How Fish Grow

The noise we make pollutes natural soundscapes and can impede how animals communicate, move, and behave. Researchers now have evidence that man-made noise impacts fish from the very beginning of their life, altering how they develop and grow.  Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island where I studied the sensory […]

Bottom trawling may irreparably damage seamount habitats

Destructive fishing practices like bottom trawling damage seafloor habitats. To see how detrimental this fishing technique might be on fragile deep-sea ecosytems, scientists investigated how long it takes seamounts to recover from bottom trawling. The results are not extremely promising. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island where I studied […]

Pros and cons of conservation: how rebounding sea otter populations impact local economies

Growing sea otter populations are seen as a conservation victory. These cute, charismatic marine mammals are rebounding from near extinction, and saving coastal ecosystems along the way. But their recovery comes with a catch that can cause conflicts with local communities. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island where I […]

Slime, baby, slime!

Hagfish might look like disgusting little slime eels, but there is so much more to these jawless fishes. Read on to learn about hagfish and what scientists are uncovering about their slime! Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island where I studied the sensory biology of deep-sea fishes. I am […]

How scientists use our nuclear past to understand whale shark life history

To properly conserve and manage species, scientists need to understand how they live, grow, and age. But even figuring that out can be difficult when they are large and elusive, like the whale shark. See how scientists can benefit from more tragic moments in our past and use the legacy of nuclear bomb trials to […]

How could putting 3-D glasses on cuttlefish change the way we think about vision?

3-D glasses-wearing cuttlefish can show us more than just the latest fashion trends. They can also teach us about evolution and may even help us develop new algorithms for machine learning! Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island where I studied the sensory biology of deep-sea fishes. I am fascinated […]

Could a novel disease help curb the lionfish invasion?

Since the first sighting in the 1980s, lionfish have rapidly invaded the waters of the Western Atlantic, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. With no natural predators, diseases, or parasites to control the growing population, the adaptable fish has easily expanded its range. However, a newly reported disease may finally be knocking down lionfish […]

Deadly neurotoxin may help de-stress pufferfish

The flesh of many pufferfish is laced with a deadly neurotoxin called tetrodotoxin. This toxin successfully wards off pufferfish predators, but tetrodotoxin may also serve a more innocuous purpose: relieving stress. Do not try this at home. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island where I studied the sensory biology […]

Larval fish foraging grounds inundated by plastic pollution

If the adage “you are what you eat” holds true, we may be in some big trouble. A recent study found that pieces of plastics are becoming concentrated in areas where larval fish hunt for food, which could be a big problem for fish and humans alike. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the […]

How the anglerfish gets its light

Deep-sea anglerfishes are known for their prominent glowing lure extending from their heads. Bacteria are behind the scenes, enabling anglerfish to create their bioluminescence. How and when do anglerfish form the bond with their bioluminescent bacterial partners? Scientists may now have an answer. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island […]

Could sponges replace expensive ocean tech?

The ocean is a big place and trying to study all of the animals living there can take a lot of time, effort, and some pretty expensive technology. Thankfully, a group of scientists may have found an alternative to the current sampling devices : Sponges. Read more about how scientists are looking into using sponges […]

Commercial fishing in Marine Protected Areas highlights the need for careful management

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) increase biodiversity and preserve ecosystem health when they are properly managed. But researchers have detected destructive practices that undermine conservation goals still occurring in many MPAs. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island where I studied the sensory biology of deep-sea fishes. I am fascinated by […]

Can you smell that? Oil spills change stingray’s sense of smell

It may have occurred 8 years ago, but scientists are still talking about the Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill. This epic oil spill made scientists recognize gaps in our knowledge about how oil impacts the environment. To explore the question of how crude oil impacts organisms, a team of scientists at Florida Atlantic University investigate […]

When having babies, is quantity or quality better?

Evolution is riddled with trade-offs. One of the classic examples is how to spread maternal resources – is it better for an individual to have a lot of babies or invest more into only one or two? Researchers examined how this trade-off plays out in the marine world by comparing the competing reproductive strategies of […]

You are Now Entering the Twilight Zone: Exploring the Unique Realm of Mesophotic Reefs

200 feet below the surface of the ocean, light slips away from view. But even here, in the mesophotic zones, life thrives. As scientists learn more about the beautiful fishes and corals that live at these depths we are finding out that they are not immune to human-induced threats. Ashley MarranzinoI received my Master’s degree […]

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  • by oceanbites 2 weeks ago
    Not all outdoor science is fieldwork. Some of the best days in the lab can be setting up experiments, especially when you get to do it outdoors. It’s an exciting mix of problem solving, precision, preparation, and teamwork. Here is
  • by oceanbites 1 month ago
    Being on a research cruise is a unique experience with the open water, 12-hour working shifts, and close quarters, but there are some familiar practices too. Here Diana is filtering seawater to gather chlorophyll for analysis, the same process on
  • by oceanbites 2 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #oceanbites  we are featuring Hannah Collins  @hannahh_irene  Hannah works with marine suspension feeding bivalves and microplastics, investigating whether ingesting microplastics causes changes to the gut microbial community or gut tissues. She hopes to keep working
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    Leveling up - did you know that crabs have a larval phase? These are both porcelain crabs, but the one on the right is the earlier stage. It’s massive spine makes it both difficult to eat and quite conspicuous in
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Cierra Braga. Cierra works ultraviolet c (UVC) to discover how this light can be used to combat biofouling, or the growth of living things, on the hulls of ships. Here, you
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Elena Gadoutsis  @haysailor  These photos feature her “favorite marine research so far: From surveying tropical coral reefs, photographing dolphins and whales, and growing my own algae to expose it to different
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on Oceanbites we are featuring Eliza Oldach. According to Ellie, “I study coastal communities, and try to understand the policies and decisions and interactions and adaptations that communities use to navigate an ever-changing world. Most of
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Jiwoon Park with a little photographic help from Ryan Tabata at the University of Hawaii. When asked about her research, Jiwoon wrote “Just like we need vitamins and minerals to stay
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #Oceanbites  we are featuring  @riley_henning  According to Riley, ”I am interested in studying small things that make a big impact in the ocean. Right now for my master's research at the University of San Diego,
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Gabby Stedman. Gabby is interested in interested in understanding how many species of small-bodied animals there are in the deep-sea and where they live so we can better protect them from
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Shawn Wang! Shawn is “an oceanographer that studies ocean conditions of the past. I use everything from microfossils to complex computer models to understand how climate has changed in the past
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    Today we are highlighting some of our awesome new authors for  #WriterWednesday  Today we have Daniel Speer! He says, “I am driven to investigate the interface of biology, chemistry, and physics, asking questions about how organisms or biological systems respond
  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
    Here at Oceanbites we love long-term datasets. So much happens in the ocean that sometimes it can be hard to tell if a trend is a part of a natural cycle or actually an anomaly, but as we gather more
  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
    Have you ever seen a lobster molt? Because lobsters have exoskeletons, every time they grow they have to climb out of their old shell, leaving them soft and vulnerable for a few days until their new shell hardens. Young, small
  • by oceanbites 7 months ago
    A lot of zooplankton are translucent, making it much easier to hide from predators. This juvenile mantis shrimp was almost impossible to spot floating in the water, but under a dissecting scope it’s features really come into view. See the
  • by oceanbites 7 months ago
    This is a clump of Dead Man’s Fingers, scientific name Codium fragile. It’s native to the Pacific Ocean and is invasive where I found it on the east coast of the US. It’s a bit velvety, and the coolest thing
  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    You’ve probably heard of jellyfish, but have you heard of salps? These gelatinous sea creatures band together to form long chains, but they can also fall apart and will wash up onshore like tiny gemstones that squish. Have you seen
  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    Check out what’s happening on a cool summer research cruise! On the  #neslter  summer transect cruise, we deployed a tow sled called the In Situ Icthyoplankton Imaging System. This can take pictures of gelatinous zooplankton (like jellyfish) that would be
  • by oceanbites 9 months ago
    Did you know horseshoe crabs have more than just two eyes? In these juveniles you can see another set in the middle of the shell. Check out our website to learn about some awesome horseshoe crab research.  #oceanbites   #plankton   #horseshoecrabs 
  • by oceanbites 9 months ago
    Feeling a bit flattened by the week? So are these summer flounder larvae. Fun fact: flounder larvae start out with their eyes set like normal fish, but as they grow one of their eyes migrates to meet the other and
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