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Abrahim El Gamal

Abrahim El Gamal has written 29 posts for oceanbites

The effects of social history on alcohol tolerance in crayfish

Lonely crawdad’s can really handle their liquor according to this study. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

Brains only for you

Brain size might dictate the laws of attraction in guppies. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

‘The conservationist is ready to see you’: triaging marine ecosystems in times of climate change

Climate change affects ecosystems worldwide, but how do conservationists decide which of planet earth’s ecosystems are most in need? Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

Like a champion Casanova in the sky

After migrating thousands of miles from their southern wintering grounds, males of a certain species of shorebird log thousands more miles scouring the summer territories for fertile females. It’s pretty nuts. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

Ain’t no killing the killifish (for now): on the virtues of genetic diversity

Atlantic killifish are spared extinction in the face of pollution thanks to their remarkable genetic diversity. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

A mercurial tug o’ war in Antarctic sea ice

DNA from bacteria living in Antarctic sea ice provides a clue to the mysterious origins of methyl mercury in seawater in the Southern Ocean. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

The long and winding Eel migration

A glimpse of the thousands’ mile migration of the European eel shows it’s anything but straightforward. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

Speed dating: how finding that special symbiosis saved some coral from climate change

Choosing the right symbiont might be a coral’s ticket to cheating global warming. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

A bad kelp review: trouble in times of warming

Kelp forests are all but disappearing due to record ocean temperatures leading to a fogging of boundaries between traditional ecosystems. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

Unhappy as a clam: contagious cancer is widespread in bivalves

Cancer is not normally thought of as an infectious disease, but researchers have discovered transmissible cancers in mussels and clams adding to a cadre of examples of contagious cancers. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

Of whales and cows: the baleen whale microbiome revealed

Scientists sequenced the microbiomes of several baleen whales that are strict carnivores and found some startling similarities to the microbiomes of terrestrial herbivores. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

One to tango: a bacterium that does the work of two in the nitrogen cycle

Scientists report bacterial species capable of performing the two-step process of nitrification, traditionally thought to exist only as a division of labor between two functionally distinct bacteria. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

Death by evolution: how a hapless adaptation aided in the untimely demise of a Lake Victorian fish

Scientists have demonstrated that a human-induced extinction of a tropical lake fish was unwittingly assisted by a millions year old evolutionary adaptation. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

More bad news for marine ecosystems (courtesy carbon dioxide)

Carbon dioxide emissions are bad for marine ecosystems, and maybe even worse than we think. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

Oceanbites Mingles With ArcticMix (Part 2)

This is part two of three in a series on the recent ArcticMix expedition lead by Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) scientists aimed at better understanding the mysterious sources of heat leading the faster-than-predicted rate of Arctic ice-melt due to global warming. Oceanbites sat down with Elizabeth “Effie” Fine, a second-year physical oceanography graduate student […]

Ice ice diatom: how microscopic algae govern ice formation in the clouds

Scientists think that particles exuded by single-cell plankton ejected into the atmosphere by sea-spray affect ice formation in clouds, and thereby the lifetime of the clouds and their ability to deflect sunlight. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

Philosopher cephalopod: the octopus genome reveals the origin of its intellect

The octopus genome sheds light on the strange intelligence of a mysterious creature. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

The benefits of warmer parents, and who’s your mama … when you’re a coral

Why some coral can take the heat better than others is in their DNA. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

Prokaryotes are prokaryotes: a sneak peak at the microbial oceans courtesy DNA  

Scientists have sequenced the microbial diversity of the world’s oceans unlocking the secrets of the microbes that run our planet. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

From 591 leagues under the sea to eukaryote and me: introducing the closest known relative to our cells

Scientists think they’ve found an ancient link to the eukaryotic cell from the deep down in the ocean, and it’s an archaeon. Abrahim El GamalAbrahim is a PhD student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego where he studies marine chemical biology.

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