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Austen Blair

Austen Blair has written 9 posts for oceanbites

A Whale Shaped Needle in a Ocean Sized Haystack

Sperm whales are very large, but they can still be tricky to find in the ocean! These researchers combined several data sets, from centuries old whaling records to modern automated location recording, to determine the locations off the southwest Australia most suitable for sperm whales, so policy makers can plan to protect these animals and other scientists can save time searching for them.

Measuring Wind is for the Birds!

There are a lot of things animals are better at than humans. What if we could get our animal colleagues to help us out with our science? This study uses birds with small GPS backpacks to measure wind speed in a way that humans just can’t!

Wasting Away in Virus-ville

Sea star wasting disease still plagues the U.S. West Coast, but clues to its nature are being uncovered. Find out how temperature may be a key player in the progression of the disease in today’s article!

EmanuelCountyLive.com

Beat the Heat: Predicting Eastern U.S. Hot Days using the Pacific Ocean

Get ready for summer! Scientists have found a new way to predict the extremely hot days that occur throughout summer, using rainfall over land and the temperature of the Pacific Ocean. Read on to learn more!

Stellar’s Sea Cow and Their Not So Stellar Demise

Steller’s Sea Cow provides an example of how many large animals in the Pleistocene may have gone extinct.

doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JTECH-D-15-0035.1

Echoes in the deep: Robots with fish finders

You might call it the Batmobile of the sea: Scientists put sound based fish finders into an underwater robot to get closer to the creatures they want to study.

Captain’s Log: Hunting for Data in an Era Gone By

Sometimes scientists of the past didn’t plan their projects too well, but we can still dig up their records and make use of the data they collected!

Some Like it Hot: Ocean Heat Content and Fish Migrations

Can a new way of looking at ocean temperatures help determine where fish like to hang out?

A Tropical Cyclone Time Machine in an Australian Cave

Scientists look far and wide to find records of our planets history. This group used layers of mud trapped inside an Australian cave to uncover clues about the history of tropical cyclones over 2,000 years ago. Find out what they learned, and what it may mean for the planet’s future

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