//
archives

Erin McLean

Erin McLean has written 39 posts for oceanbites

Stop: Recovery Time!: Using volcanoes to model recovery of deep-sea communities

Deep sea communities are full of weird and wonderful animals that we don’t know much about, and human demand for sulfides may lead to deep sea mining near their habitat. We don’t know how they’ll respond to a disturbance, so these researchers looked at what happens after a natural disturbance: a volcanic eruption. Read on […]

Are marine “nuisance” species expected to increase under ocean acidification?

Most studies that look at how animals respond to climate change look at species we like – oysters, corals, and whales are just a few examples. The authors of this review looked at something else – how are the species we hate going to respond to climate change, specifically ocean acidification? Read on to find […]

Will Climate Change Alter How We Vacation?

When we talk about climate change, usually we talk about the effects that it’ll have on the environment and the animals that inhabit it; rarely do we talk about the impact that it can have on something as seemingly unrelated as tourism. However, tourism in regions known for their natural beauty is just as much […]

The new fad diet for sea turtles? Plastics

Paper: Wedemeyer, K. R., George, S., James, H. B., Peterson, T. D., Wicksten, M. K. and Plotkin, P. T. (2015). High frequency of occurrence of anthropogenic debris ingestion by sea turtles in the North Pacific Ocean. Mar. Biol. Background If you’re a coastal resident, I’m sure you see the same thing as I do when I […]

Diving birds find an abundant food source in a surprising place

Jellyfish have been getting some bad press recently, and for good reason. As temperatures warm, jellyfish increase in number, and they eat up a lot of the food necessary for other animals in the food web. This new study suggests that jellyfish may be impacting the food web in a different, positive way: by providing […]

Beyond the shell: What are hermit crabs really after?

A favorite activity for beachgoers is to comb the sand and tide pools for marine life, and one of the most familiar tide pool animals is the hermit crab. Kids and parents alike love to find them out on the rocks, but how much do we really know about them? This article explores the important […]

Giant Clams Catch a Giant Break

Most of today’s research into the effects of climate change and ocean acidification is all doom and gloom: this animal and that ecosystem are developmentally challenged as a result of warming temperatures and lowered pH. This new study out of Australia is a rare bit of good news in the field, finding that giant clams […]

Gulls in Argentina bully whales into changing their behavior

Whales are a lot like people: if something’s annoying or hurting you, you’ll go out of your way to avoid it, and whales do the same thing. This study out of Argentina focuses on how gull attacks have changed the way southern right whales breathe. Read on to find out what they do differently! Erin […]

Can sperm cells make it in an acidified ocean?

Researchers in Australia investigated whether sea urchin sperm are going to make it through an acidified ocean or if they’ve reached their tipping point. Read on to learn more! Erin McLeanHi and welcome to oceanbites! I recently finished my master’s degree at URI, focusing on lobsters and how they respond metabolically to ocean acidification projections. […]

Highlights from the National Shellfisheries Meeting

Ever wanted to know what it’s like to go to a scientific conference? Here’s a summary of what conferences are all about, plus the four most interesting talks I saw at this year’s National Shellfisheries Association meeting. Erin McLeanHi and welcome to oceanbites! I recently finished my master’s degree at URI, focusing on lobsters and […]

Best laid plans of lobsters and men: More disease prevalent in marine protected areas

Everyone usually agrees that establishing more protected areas in our oceans will help overfished populations recover. But what if that’s not the whole story? Read on to find out how an increase of lobsters in a British marine protected area has resulted in a higher prevalence of shell disease. Erin McLeanHi and welcome to oceanbites! […]

What do diabetics and cone snails have in common? The need for insulin

Cone snails are a family of organisms that use venom injected into the water to help them capture their prey. A new study suggests that one of the components of their venom cocktail is insulin, the same hormone that diabetics use to lower their blood pressure. How does that work? Read on to find out!  […]

Microplastics Rolling in the Deep

Everyone knows that there’s a lot of plastic floating around in our oceans – we see it on our beaches and in the news. But, did you know that there’s also a lot of plastic sinking in our oceans? This study looked at microplastics and found that they’re everywhere in the deep sea sediment. Plastic […]

Prozac and Cons: How Marine Snails React to Antidepressants

Ever wonder where our antidepressants go after they pass through our systems? Like all waste, our drugs pass out of our body and into our wastewater systems, where they eventually enter the ocean. If these drugs can affect people, do they affect marine life, too? Read on to find out. Erin McLeanHi and welcome to […]

Fatal attraction: Under climate change, fish swimming towards predators, not away from them

There are all kinds of ways that climate change can directly affect marine life – habitat loss, changes in the food web, and decreased oxygen levels all come to mind – but there are also more insidious ways that climate change can harm fish. This study explores how elevated CO2 in the water makes fish […]

Whale Watching: Fun for Us, Stressful for Them

Whale watching is a popular activity around New England, especially in the summer, but this new study suggests we’re doing more than just watching – we’re actually stressing these whales out and making them swim faster and breathe more often. Erin McLeanHi and welcome to oceanbites! I recently finished my master’s degree at URI, focusing […]

Suck It!: Why Octopus Arms Don’t Stick To Each Other

Many students have wondered why the sticky, sucker-covered arms of the octopus don’t stick to one another as the animal goes about its daily business. Finally, four researchers have given us the answer: something in the octopus’ skin keeps the suckers from sticking there. Erin McLeanHi and welcome to oceanbites! I recently finished my master’s […]

Keep it Down!: Eels Having Problems Avoiding Predators in Noisy Waters

We don’t traditionally think of our ships making noise that will disrupt animal behavior, but this study, looking at eels antipredation behavior under noisy and quiet conditions – shows that animals can be negatively affected by noise pollution. Erin McLeanHi and welcome to oceanbites! I recently finished my master’s degree at URI, focusing on lobsters […]

The Seventh Sense: Catfish Sense pH Changes

Some catfish aren’t just limited to the traditional five senses – instead, they have a unique adaptation to sense pH changes in the water to help them find their prey. Erin McLeanHi and welcome to oceanbites! I recently finished my master’s degree at URI, focusing on lobsters and how they respond metabolically to ocean acidification […]

Subscribe to oceanbites

@oceanbites on Twitter

WP Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com