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Amanda Semler

Amanda Semler has written 8 posts for oceanbites

Artificial Upwelling Saves Corals from Bleaching

Coral reefs are under threat due to a warming climate. Learn about a technologically-savvy new way to counteract the effects of these warmer temperatures: Artificial Upwelling systems. Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in Earth System Science at Stanford University, and I study how microbes in deep ocean sediments produce and consume greenhouse gases. I’m a […]

So You Thought the Heatwave was Over?

Satellites that measure sea surface temperature have demonstrated that marine heatwaves are becoming more frequent, longer, and more intense as a result of climate change. But how can ocean temperatures in the future be predicted? And where in the ocean are the heatwaves most likely to occur? Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in Earth System […]

Life at One Hundred Million Years Old

A team of scientists traveled to the South Pacific Gyre and discovered 100 million year old, energy-starved microorganisms hidden below the seafloor. With a little bit of food (and patience), the team brought these ancient microbes back to life in the laboratory, using carbon isotopes for their detective work. Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in […]

Undersea Volcanoes Explode Dramatically

Under the incredible pressures of the deep sea, how do volcanoes erupt? And how do these eruptions affect the marine environment? An international team of scientists simulated pressurized eruptions in the lab, and developed an explosive new theory explaining how they occur. Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in Earth System Science at Stanford University, and […]

Oil and Gas Seeps: Microbial Elevators through Ocean Sediments

Many microorganisms live in ocean sediments – both at the seafloor, as well as in the subsurface hundreds to thousands of meters below. But how do these separate microbial populations interact, and what are the consequences? Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in Earth System Science at Stanford University, and I study how microbes in deep […]

A Song of Ice and Sea Level Rise

How much ice is really being lost in the polar regions, and what have been the consequences? A team of scientists use NASA satellites to determine ice mass loss in Greenland and Antarctica since 2003, and the resulting sea level rise. Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in Earth System Science at Stanford University, and I […]

Superoxide: A Super Sink of Ocean Oxygen

Ever wondered how oxygen gets depleted in the ocean? A new study suggests that a significant fraction is transformed into superoxide – an intriguing molecule that biologists love to hate. Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in Earth System Science at Stanford University, and I study how microbes in deep ocean sediments produce and consume greenhouse […]

A Seasonal “Freeze” on Arctic Methane Release

According to new research from the Arctic University of Norway, current greenhouse gas budgets overestimate the amount of methane released from the Arctic Ocean to the atmosphere. Read on to find out why that’s the case, and why this news is not entirely good. Amanda SemlerI’m a PhD candidate in Earth System Science at Stanford […]

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