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Anna Robuck

Anna Robuck has written 30 posts for oceanbites

SciComm Roundup: Interview with Megan Lubetkin, creator of the Synergist Volumes

Oceanbites caught up with URI-GSO student Megan Lubetkin, about her Fall 2018 work creating the Synergist Volumes event series. Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann Lab. My current research interests include environmental chemistry, water quality, as well as coastal and […]

Growing a Scientist: Undergraduate Research 2018, part 3

Check out these posts by guest authors Deborah Leopo, Mike Miller, Whitney Marshall, and Robert Lewis about deep sea snail species, sea level rise, and tectonic modeling–these students were part of the SURFO program at URI-GSO over Summer 2018, and have some really exciting research to share! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student […]

Growing a Scientist: Undergraduate Research 2018, part 2

Check out these posts by guest authors Anna Ward, Cassandra Alexander, Lauren Cook, and Sarah Paulson about microzooplankton, harmful algae blooms, daily migration in the deep sea, and eastern oysters–these students were part of the SURFO program at URI-GSO over Summer 2018, and have some really exciting research to share! Anna RobuckI am a third […]

Growing a Scientist: Undergraduate Research 2018, part 1

Check out these posts by guest authors Ellie Tan, Samantha Vaverka, Joseph Barnes, and Gibson Levitt about building water quality monitoring systems, toxic algae, and robot kayaks–these students were part of the SURFO program at URI-GSO over Summer 2018, and have some really exciting research to share! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student […]

Preparing for Research at Sea: Behind the Scenes

Research at sea is no small feat! Read this guest post by URI GSO SURFO student Anna Ward about her experiences helping prepare for a cruise expedition! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann Lab. My current research interests include environmental […]

Seabird tagging 101

How do we know where seabirds live and eat? Not such an easy question without special technology! Check out this article to learn how researchers tag seabirds in the Gulf of Maine to learn about their habitat use. Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of […]

Studying Leopard Seals in Antarctica

Check out this article by guest author Sarah Kienle about her recent research expedition to Antarctica to study leopard seals! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann Lab. My current research interests include environmental chemistry, water quality, as well as coastal […]

Circulation running amok? Scientists think it could be happening in the North Atlantic

Check out this oceanbites take on two recent articles that suggest Atlantic circulation is slower now than it has been for the past 1000 years (and why this matters to you!). Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann Lab. My current […]

Marine Snow & Muddy Megacoring on the Southern Ocean

Check out this guest post by Marlo Garnsworthy to read about an exciting voyage to the Southern Ocean…Marlo took part in a several week research cruise to learn about climate change using sediment samples from the region…read on to learn about the experience and see Marlo’s great pictures! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD […]

Appreciate seafood? Climate change isn’t your friend.

Seafood depends on healthy food webs that support fish populations…but food webs depend on environmental conditions! Read on to learn how changing environmental conditions due to climate change stand to change the base of the food web, with far-reaching consequences. Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate […]

Hey grad students! ComSciCon 2018 applications are open!

Want to be part of the best weekend of the year? ComSciCon 2018 is accepting applications for a weekend workshop that scicomm enthusiasts aren’t going to want to miss! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann Lab. My current research interests […]

Summertime skincare: bowhead whales use rocks to help peel off molting skin

Whale summer skin care? Yes, it really is a thing. Read on to learn how bowhead whales in the eastern Canadian Arctic replace their skin over the summer with the help of undersea boulders. Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann […]

Toxins in turds: learning about algal toxins with sea lion poop

What do you, a penguin, and an amoeba have in common? You all have to go #2! These researchers from Washington found a special purpose for sea lions and this basic bodily function. Read on to learn about how this team examined sea lion scat to learn about yearly exposure to harmful algal toxins along […]

Small but mighty: the importance of forage fish to larger marine creatures

Forage fish like menhaden or capelin are vital to the health of larger marine animals; read on to learn how researchers from the University of Manitoba looked into just how important forage fish are to a northwestern Atlantic food web! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate […]

More than just a game of tag: learning about seabird habitat use through tagging studies

Tagging seabirds has only been possible with recent developments in technology, but we can learn a ton about their distribution and behavior through tagging studies. Read on to hear how it is done! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography in the Lohmann Lab. […]

Saving seabirds: how mammal management has turned into seabird success

Seabirds and invasive species have been a poor mix for centuries, yet new research suggests seabird populations are bouncing back from invasive species damage. Read on to hear about seabird success following invasive predator removal on islands across the globe! Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate […]

Awareness Inspires Conservation

Save the whales… save the ocean… but save the sharks? This is a mission that is still new, and often surprising, to many. The Atlantic White Shark Conservancy is working hard to conserve white sharks specifically, and in doing so has learned that they have to work to change public perception of this critically important […]

Out of sight, but not out of mind: human created chemicals persist deep in the Arctic Ocean  

Human created chemicals can be “too good” at their job, remaining persistent and/or toxic in the environment, well beyond the life span of their commercial use. Read on to explore how DDT was found at depths up to 2500 m in the Arctic Ocean by a team from Stockholm University. Anna RobuckI am a third […]

Fintastic friends: even sharks prefer familiar faces

Researchers at the Bimini Field Biological Station Shark Lab investigated shark group preferences in juvenile lemon sharks, and the results are in: even sharks prefer their “friends” over strangers! Read on to learn more about these fin-tastic friendships. Anna RobuckI am a third year PhD student at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of […]

Microplastics demystified: a review examining how these tiny plastics act in pollutant transfer

Paper: Lohmann, R. Microplastics Are Not Important for the Cycling and Bioaccumulation of Organic Pollutants in the Oceans—but Should Microplastics Be Considered POPs Themselves? 2017. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management 13, 460-465. DOI: 10.1002/ieam.1914 Not so fantastic plastic The development of plastic revolutionized daily life. We owe our convenient modern lifestyle to these polymers in […]

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