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Caoxin Sun

Caoxin Sun has written 18 posts for oceanbites

Pollutants have fun sliding downhill in submarine canyons!

Many of us believe that the deep ocean is pristine and not affected by any human activities; the fact that pollutants such as perfluoroalkyl substances can reach deep ocean gives us a warning sign. It was estimated that around 60 kg of these chemicals was transported during the sampling periods. Caoxin SunCaoxin is a graduate […]

These Volatile Pollutants Can’t Fly, but Can They Hop?

Volatile methyl siloxanes can be easily found in personal care products (e.g. shampoo, lotion and cream) . Recently, scientists detected these compounds in soils, vegetation, phytoplankton, and krill samples from the Antarctic Peninsula region. This finding brings into question the belief that these compounds are not able to reach remote terrestrial and marine surfaces. Caoxin […]

“Magic Sand” Cleans up floating oil

Currently, spreading dispersants is the most common way to stabilize surface oil after oil spill. These dispersants divide oil into small droplets which are more available to bacteria. However, this application of dispersants is not applicable near the coast and the toxicity of dispersants remains to be studied. Natural granular material could be a more […]

Global change and the future ocean

The Growing number of environmental changes, such as contamination of seafood, shortage of water and increased frequency of extreme weather (floods, drought, hurricanes, etc), has raised people’s concerns about the Earth’s ability to sustain human populations. Caoxin SunCaoxin is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. Her […]

Methylated Mercury Cycling in the Canadian Arctic Marine Boundary Layer

Monomethylmercury (MMHg) is the most toxic form of mercury (Hg) to humans and wildlife. In the environment it concentrates (or “bioaccumulates”) in fish and shellfish. This increase in methylmercury concentration is further amplified up the food chain when, for example, people consume seafood. Mercury (Hg) found in Arctic marine mammals and fish are on the […]

How Does Pacific Island Climate Change Under Various El-Niño

El Niño impacts vary among different geographic regions and El Niño types. A single El Niño event may bring drought to one Pacific Island country while increasing rainfall in another. Caoxin SunCaoxin is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. Her research interest lies in persistent organic […]

Passive Sampling for Antiparasitics near a Chile Salmon Farm

An increase in the number of positive cages and cage-level abundance of sea lice in southern Chile was shown since 2004. The prevalence of sea lice in the fish farms was 53.4%, and the average sea lice abundance was 11.8 per fish (poor salmon)! In order to gain control over parasites, synthetic pyrethoid has been […]

The first day after an oil spill

Crude oil is mostly composed of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) which are toxic to organisms. After an oil spill, it is crucial to investigate the fractionation of compounds partitioning into the air and water to aid in predicting their threat to downwind population and the marine community. Caoxin SunCaoxin is a graduate student […]

Fish don’t need to lineup at Starbucks to get their morning coffee – they’re swimming in it!

Pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitors, biocides and stimulants are some of the most frequently detected micropollutants in the aquatic environment. They are toxic, bioaccumulative and hard to degrade. They can pose risks to the local ecosystem or even human health. Caoxin SunCaoxin is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode […]

Seafood? Yes! Plastics? No!

Seafood is an important part of people’s diets worldwide, so it is crucial to understand the presence of microplastics in seafood. Van Cauwenberghe and Janssen measured plastics ingested by the mussel Mytilus edulis and the oyster Crassostrea gigas because of their filter-feeding behaviors. Caoxin SunCaoxin is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Oceanography […]

Ocean Ecosystem Stressors Influence Human Health

Healthy coastal and marine environments are of great importance to human beings. They provide many ecosystem services, which are water and food supply, temperature maintenance, storm protection, recreation etc; yet currently, many of these environments are being degraded by several environmental stressors. Caoxin SunCaoxin is a graduate student in the Graduate School of Oceanography at […]

Arctic Feels Hotter than Other Parts of the World

Speaking of climate change, you can easily picture a scene in which big ice sheets are melting and poor polar bears standing on the last piece of ice finding nowhere to live. To some extent this is true, since impact from global warming can be amplified in Arctic region. Caoxin SunCaoxin is a graduate student […]

Rapid Reductions in North Atlantic Deep Water during the Peak of the Last Interglacial Period

North Atlantic deep water forms primarily in more extreme northern latitudes due to the colder, saltier water with a higher density. When this flow of water goes south it mixes with the cold Antarctic water and then redistributes into other parts of the world. As high latitude warming and ocean refreshing reduce water density, North […]

Reevaluating of Hydrate-Controlled Methane Seepage from Study off Svalbard

Methane, which is an even more powerful greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide, has been a great concern as climate change may lead to large quantities of emissions of methane. Due to the temperature-dependent stability of methane, it is claimed that a fraction of methane would be released from the warming up ocean water. Caoxin SunCaoxin […]

Sea ice leads cause changes in mercury and ozone levels in the Arctic

In our changing climate, the opening and closing of sea-ice is occurring more frequently, resulting from thick perennial Arctic sea ice shifting into thin seasonal ice sheets. This physical phenomenon can not only affect the energy balance in the Arctic, but can also have some influence on its atmospheric chemistry involving components such as mercury […]

Is Aragonite Saturation State (Ωa) the Best Way to Describe Calcification Rate?

Nearly every scientific report concerning the effects of ocean acidification on coral reefs describes changes in calcification as a function of the aragonite saturation state (Ωa). Is this the best parameter that we can use to represent calcification condition? Are there any other options? Caoxin SunCaoxin is a graduate student in the Graduate School of […]

Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) Entering Deeper Ocean via Vertical Eddy Diffusion

The ocean is home to many creatures: plankton, fish, mammals, etc. But it is also ‘home’ to a number of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), which are usually at low concentrations in the water but have the potential to bioaccumulate. Where do these pollutants end up? Do they stay in the surface water or do they […]

Coral Reefs Suffering from Ocean Acidification

Researchers investigated natural trends in carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat in the central Great Barrier Reef on diel and seasonal timescales. They found the reef flat is below a calcification threshold, which implies that a transition in the reef may occur from a state of net calcification to dissolution, around 26.9% of the […]

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  • by oceanbites 1 month ago
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  • by oceanbites 2 months ago
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  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
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  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
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  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
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  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
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  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    Today is the day of  #shutdownacademia  and  #shutdownstem  and many of us at the Oceanbites team are taking the day to plan solid actions for how we can make our organization and the institutions we work at a better place
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