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Nyla Husain

Nyla Husain has written 23 posts for oceanbites

SURFO Special: Has COVID-19 Affected Plane Emissions?

Since March, COVID-19 has had a huge impact on how we live our day-to-day lives. But how has it changed our carbon emissions? SURFO student Bella Luikart spent this summer with the Palter Lab at GSO to find out. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I […]

SURFO Special: The Power of a Swirl

What makes the Mid Atlantic Bight off the U.S. East Coast so unique? SURFO student Madeline Mamer spent this past summer with the Palter Lab at GSO to find out more about the ocean currents there. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale […]

A call for clouds in climate models

In this throwback to last March, learn how clouds influence the greenhouse effect. This climate modeling study focused on their potential disappearance as carbon emissions continue to rise. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study how physical features like […]

Climate-driven events leave an imprint on corals in the Great Barrier Reef

In this re-post, we discuss the ecological memory of corals from bleaching events that occurred back-to-back in 2016 and 2017. With this pattern repeating itself in 2020, has mass bleaching become a near-annual event? Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model […]

Envisioning a better world with climate impact modeling

After October 2018, the global perspective on climate change started to shift. We dive into climate impact models, and how they could help us plan for a future in which climate change impacts every aspect of our lives. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use […]

One thousand ways to experience climate loss

What exactly are we at risk of losing as the planet warms? One recent study aims to track climate-driven loss that is hard to define. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study how physical features like surface waves at […]

Think global, act local: how lake microbes respond to their environments

How do microbes in lake sediments respond to small and large scale influences, and what does it have to do with climate change? Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study how physical features like surface waves at the air-sea […]

SURFO Special: GPS – An Unconventional Tidal Gauge

Every summer, the URI Graduate School of Oceanography hosts undergraduate research interns called SURFOs. In this post, learn about Ben Watzak’s 2019 SURFO research using GPS to track sea level rise! Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study how […]

Power plays in low carbon pathways: how elite groups may influence a green transition

Learn how elite groups can guide and shape climate initiatives (spoiler alert: it’s spoooooky) – and what we can do to move towards a just transition away from fossil fuels. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study how physical […]

Lost in transmission: how the delivery of electricity has its own carbon emissions

The life cycle of electric power is more complex than we give it credit for. Learn how researchers have estimated the carbon emissions that result from simply delivering electric power to our homes – and what can be done to curb them. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School […]

SURFO Special: Keep clam and carry on! Comparing diet differences in awning clams and quahogs

Every summer, the URI Graduate School of Oceanography hosts undergraduate research interns called SURFOs. In this post, learn about Sommer Meyer’s 2019 SURFO research doing isotope analysis on Rhode Island’s local clams and quahogs! Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model […]

SURFO Special: Surveying hazardous faults during Eastern Haiti’s 270-year earthquake hiatus

Every summer, the URI Graduate School of Oceanography hosts undergraduate research interns called SURFOs. In this post, learn about Kamal James’ 2019 SURFO research surveying hazardous faults beneath a lake in Eastern Haiti. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to […]

Tracking the transience of lake ice in a changing climate

Changes in seasonal lake ice are threatening the lives of those who depend on it. Find out how scientists are tracking them. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study how physical features like surface waves at the air-sea interface […]

New York City’s poop is a source of greenhouse gas emissions. Now what?

The Hudson River has been a Superfund site since 1984, but pollution continues to be a problem today. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study how physical features like surface waves at the air-sea interface produce friction for the […]

Rugged Southern Ocean phytoplankton weather the storms

Phytoplankton from the “wild west” of the world’s oceans have learned to regrow after storms… over and over and over again. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study how physical features like surface waves at the air-sea interface produce […]

Do we know what it means to engineer the climate?

At this point, it’s undeniable that the climate is changing rapidly. What are our options for mitigation? Many scientists are considering strategies that involve engineering the climate – also known as geoengineering. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study […]

Beyond cannibalism, can tide pools help explain the universe?

It turns out tide pools are a lot more complex than they seem – and often inhabited by cannibals. Can we glean answers to the universe by peering into them? John Steinbeck seemed to think so. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale […]

Millennial algae are not as productive: lazy, or less sea ice opportunities?

Why aren’t Arctic phytoplankton as productive as they used to be? Is it a lazy millennial thing, or something more complex and systematic? Researchers use observations to learn more about this generation of phytoplankton, and what it could mean for Gen Z and beyond… Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s […]

Turtle hatchlings attracted to artificial light like moths to a flame

On this Turtle Tuesday, find out how artificial lighting along coastlines due to industrial and commercial development is affecting sea turtle hatchling survival. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study how physical features like surface waves at the air-sea […]

The ongoing story of Hurricane Harvey

With the start of the 2018 hurricane season, we explore what happened last year during one of the costliest hurricanes in U.S. history – and why. Nyla HusainI’m a PhD student at the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography. I use a small-scale computer model to study how physical features like surface waves […]

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