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Anastasia Yandulskaya

Anastasia Yandulskaya has written 24 posts for oceanbites

Mommy dearest: Female sperm whales are the pillars of their families

Still living with your mom? Nothing to be embarrassed about – especially if you are a sperm whale! Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders called axolotls. In my free time, I like to read science fiction, bake, go on walks […]

Going with your gut? Not if you are a sea cucumber

This creature poops out its guts when spooked! But can it grow them back? Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders called axolotls. In my free time, I like to read science fiction, bake, go on walks around Boston, and dig […]

How to find a nursery for a baby manta ray

Great news! Scientists discovered lots of cute baby manta rays off the Floridian coast. Only two other manta ray nurseries had ever been identified in the entire world – talk about trying to find a daycare! But why do manta rays have nurseries – and how can we find more of them? Anastasia YandulskayaI am […]

Drowning in bad news about the ocean? Cheer up with these uplifting stories!

Bad news fatigue is real, and a strategy called ocean optimism means to tackle it. These success stories of victories in ocean preservation are sure to keep your spirits up! Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders called axolotls. In my […]

Wormception: How one parasite lives inside its cousin

Where do worms live? In the dirt, on sidewalks after a rain storm, and on the bottom of the sea in muddy sediments. A new study has revealed a new species of ocean worm along with its peculiar living arrangements – inside other ocean worms. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in […]

Where other bugs fear to tread: seals carry superdiving lice

Seals carry their lice everywhere they go, including their deep dives in the ocean. But how do seal lice fare under the crushing water pressure? Miraculously, they live, which makes them the only insects known to survive under the sea. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of […]

SURFO Special: How do you take a perfect picture…underwater?

Capturing the perfect picture has always been difficult… especially underwater. Current methods tend to be expensive and hard to operate, but there may be a new way to take better pictures underwater. Read on to learn how a SURFO student Samuel Bultman design a cost-effective and easy-to-use device that takes the perfect pictures underwater. Anastasia […]

SURFO Special: Ocean Color Optics and Imaging: Phytoplankton in Narragansett Bay

What can the color of the ocean tell us about the tiny algae that live in it? SURFO student Taylor Bowen spent this summer researching the relationship between light and the well-being of phytoplankton. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders […]

SURFO Special: How can understanding the scenarios of rising sea levels help New England parks prepare for Nor’easters?

Will Cape Cod ever become an island? Rising sea levels come with increased threats of flooding, especially in the areas already ravaged by storms. How can we predict the effects of sea level rise on coastal lands? SURFO student Louis Borrelli spent this summer figuring it out. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern […]

Where’s that accent from? Dolphins from different seas talk in different whistles

Dolphins talk to each other by whistling, but whistle sounds vary between seas. What causes those differences in dolphin accents? Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders called axolotls. In my free time, I like to read science fiction, bake, go […]

How does an octopus decide what to eat?

Under the sea, octopuses spend a lot of time hunting their dinner. Their choice of prey ranges from clams to crabs to fish. When picking from this extensive menu, do octopuses care more what the food looks like or what it smells like? Scientists now have an answer. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at […]

Counterintuitive? Fish make more brain cells in water rich with carbon dioxide

Fish continuously make new neurons in their brain. Ocean acidification is harmful for marine life, but can it help fish grow even more brain cells? Scientists say – maybe. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders called axolotls. In my free […]

Why don’t whales have strokes?

Whales can’t breathe underwater. But even though whale brains should be damaged by the lack of oxygen, they aren’t. Scientists have found out why. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders called axolotls. In my free time, I like to read […]

The Adventures of Shell-ock Holmes: A case of green sea turtles

How can scientists find sea turtles in the ocean? Traditional methods like capturing and tagging are invasive and expensive. Is there another way? Following turtle tracks in the ocean may be the answer. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders called […]

Sensitive skin? Dolphins feel touch best on their faces

Hands are among the most touch-sensitive body parts for humans, but what about dolphins? Scientists studied how well dolphins feel touch from head to tail – and found the most touch-sensitive parts. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water salamanders called axolotls. […]

Octopuses can learn from an iPad too

As many universities are moving this semester’s coursework online, some may be wondering if learning from a screen is really that efficient. It turns out that it works pretty well – at least for octopuses. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the nervous system in water […]

Athletic Atlantic salmon grow more brain cells than couch potato Atlantic salmon

Exercise is good for growing muscles – and, as it turns out, cells in the salmon brain. After three weeks of swimming against a strong current, young Atlantic salmon had more cells born in their brains. What does this mean for salmon? Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study […]

Development of some baby fish may not be harmed by climate change

Climate change is making our oceans warmer and more acidic. These changes are bad for many fish larvae, which may develop incorrectly. But scientists have discovered that development of larval yellowtail kingfish may be unaffected by the changing waters. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the […]

You are what you eat: Microplastics travel from food to the brain

Oceans are full of microplastics. These tiny plastic particles end up in the stomach of marine animals. Now, scientists have discovered that microplastics can travel from the stomach of velvet swimming crabs to other organs – including the brain. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate at Northeastern University in Boston. I study regeneration of the […]

No nerves lost: Octopuses can regenerate their nervous system.

Octopuses have complex behaviors, like communicating with other octopuses by changing color patterns of their skin. Damage to the nerve that controls this behavior takes away the skin patterning abilities. As it turns out, this nerve can repair itself after an injury – and colorful patterns come back too. Anastasia YandulskayaI am a PhD candidate […]

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    Being on a research cruise is a unique experience with the open water, 12-hour working shifts, and close quarters, but there are some familiar practices too. Here Diana is filtering seawater to gather chlorophyll for analysis, the same process on
  • by oceanbites 1 month ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #oceanbites  we are featuring Hannah Collins  @hannahh_irene  Hannah works with marine suspension feeding bivalves and microplastics, investigating whether ingesting microplastics causes changes to the gut microbial community or gut tissues. She hopes to keep working
  • by oceanbites 2 months ago
    Leveling up - did you know that crabs have a larval phase? These are both porcelain crabs, but the one on the right is the earlier stage. It’s massive spine makes it both difficult to eat and quite conspicuous in
  • by oceanbites 2 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Cierra Braga. Cierra works ultraviolet c (UVC) to discover how this light can be used to combat biofouling, or the growth of living things, on the hulls of ships. Here, you
  • by oceanbites 2 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Elena Gadoutsis  @haysailor  These photos feature her “favorite marine research so far: From surveying tropical coral reefs, photographing dolphins and whales, and growing my own algae to expose it to different
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on Oceanbites we are featuring Eliza Oldach. According to Ellie, “I study coastal communities, and try to understand the policies and decisions and interactions and adaptations that communities use to navigate an ever-changing world. Most of
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Jiwoon Park with a little photographic help from Ryan Tabata at the University of Hawaii. When asked about her research, Jiwoon wrote “Just like we need vitamins and minerals to stay
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  on  #Oceanbites  we are featuring  @riley_henning  According to Riley, ”I am interested in studying small things that make a big impact in the ocean. Right now for my master's research at the University of San Diego,
  • by oceanbites 3 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Gabby Stedman. Gabby is interested in interested in understanding how many species of small-bodied animals there are in the deep-sea and where they live so we can better protect them from
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    This week for  #WriterWednesday  at  #Oceanbites  we are featuring Shawn Wang! Shawn is “an oceanographer that studies ocean conditions of the past. I use everything from microfossils to complex computer models to understand how climate has changed in the past
  • by oceanbites 4 months ago
    Today we are highlighting some of our awesome new authors for  #WriterWednesday  Today we have Daniel Speer! He says, “I am driven to investigate the interface of biology, chemistry, and physics, asking questions about how organisms or biological systems respond
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    Here at Oceanbites we love long-term datasets. So much happens in the ocean that sometimes it can be hard to tell if a trend is a part of a natural cycle or actually an anomaly, but as we gather more
  • by oceanbites 5 months ago
    Have you ever seen a lobster molt? Because lobsters have exoskeletons, every time they grow they have to climb out of their old shell, leaving them soft and vulnerable for a few days until their new shell hardens. Young, small
  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
    A lot of zooplankton are translucent, making it much easier to hide from predators. This juvenile mantis shrimp was almost impossible to spot floating in the water, but under a dissecting scope it’s features really come into view. See the
  • by oceanbites 6 months ago
    This is a clump of Dead Man’s Fingers, scientific name Codium fragile. It’s native to the Pacific Ocean and is invasive where I found it on the east coast of the US. It’s a bit velvety, and the coolest thing
  • by oceanbites 7 months ago
    You’ve probably heard of jellyfish, but have you heard of salps? These gelatinous sea creatures band together to form long chains, but they can also fall apart and will wash up onshore like tiny gemstones that squish. Have you seen
  • by oceanbites 7 months ago
    Check out what’s happening on a cool summer research cruise! On the  #neslter  summer transect cruise, we deployed a tow sled called the In Situ Icthyoplankton Imaging System. This can take pictures of gelatinous zooplankton (like jellyfish) that would be
  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    Did you know horseshoe crabs have more than just two eyes? In these juveniles you can see another set in the middle of the shell. Check out our website to learn about some awesome horseshoe crab research.  #oceanbites   #plankton   #horseshoecrabs 
  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    Feeling a bit flattened by the week? So are these summer flounder larvae. Fun fact: flounder larvae start out with their eyes set like normal fish, but as they grow one of their eyes migrates to meet the other and
  • by oceanbites 8 months ago
    Have you seen a remote working setup like this? This is a photo from one of our Oceanbites team members Anne Hartwell. “A view from inside the control can of an underwater robot we used to explore the deep parts
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